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construct the shortest possible sequence of integers ending with A, using the following rules:

the first element of the sequence is 1, each of the successive elements is the sum of any two preceding elements (adding a single element to itself is also permissible), each element is larger than all the preceding elements; that is, the sequence is increasing.

For example, for A = 42, a possible solutions is [1, 2, 3, 6, 12, 24, 30, 42]. Another possible solution is [1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 16, 21, 42].

I have written the following but it fails on input of 456, by returning[1,2,4,8,16,32,64,128,200,256,456] , there are no numbers in the sequence that can be added together to get 200.

how can I fix the below code? what am I doing wrong?

  public static int[] hit(int n)
    {
        List<int> nums = new List<int>();

        int x = 1;

        while (x < n)
        {
            nums.Add(x);
            x = x * 2;

            if (x > n)
            {

                    nums.Add(n - (x / 2));

                nums.Add(n);
            }
        }

        nums.Sort();
        int[] arr =  nums.ToArray();
        return arr;
    }
share|improve this question
    
What is your question? – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 28 '12 at 14:44
    
@FarhadTaran: What debugging have you done so far? – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 28 '12 at 14:47
    
"what am I doing wrong?" For one, you never even check if any of the numbers can be obtained by adding two of the previous. – Daniel Fischer Apr 28 '12 at 14:49
    
Your algorithm is simply wrong. You want something recursive to iterate over all possible sequences, breaking the ones that pass your desired number, and take the shortest sequence. – SimpleVar Apr 28 '12 at 14:50
    
@FarhadTaran - do you see what you started?? – Chris Gessler Apr 28 '12 at 17:24

I know there is gonna be a mathematical proof behind this, but my guess would be along the lines of dividing the number by 2, if it divides equally, repeat the process. If the there is a remainder, it would be 1. So you would have the integer quotient and the quotient plus one. Since one is guaranteed to be in the set, the larger of the 2 numbers is already taken care of. So just repeat the process for the smaller. This problem certainly implies a recursive solution that should be relatively trivial, so I will leave that up to the poster to implement.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's not that simple, unfortunately. That method would give [1,2,3,6,7,14,15] for 15, but there is [1,2,3,6,12,15] a shorter chain. – Daniel Fischer Apr 28 '12 at 21:47
    
No, for 15 it would give 15, 8, 7, 4, 3, 2, 1. But you are still correct. I am wrong :) – Lucas Apr 29 '12 at 15:30

I think I got it:

public Set<Integer> shortList(int n){
    Set<Integer> result = new HashSet<Integer>();
    Stack<Integer> stack = new Stack<Integer>();
    result.add(n);
    int num=n, den=0;
    while(num>1){
        while(num > den){
            num--; den++;
            if(num%den==0)
                stack.push(num);
        }//num>den
        if(!stack.isEmpty()){
            num = stack.pop();
            result.add(num);
            stack.clear();
        }else{
            result.add(num);
            result.add(den);
        }
        den=0;
    }
    return result;
}//

Results (unsorted)

for 42: [1, 2, 3, 21, 6, 7, 42, 14]
for 15: [1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 15]
for 310: [1, 2, 155, 4, 5, 310, 10, 124, 62, 31, 15, 30]
share|improve this answer
    
You got the same length (13) for an input of 495 as I did, however the testing site says that's too long. Any ideas? – Ben Voigt Apr 29 '12 at 2:39
    
I am looking to see how they got a shorter answer, I am not seeing it yet. I'll keep looking. – kasavbere Apr 29 '12 at 4:34
    
I eventually found [1 2 4 8 16 32 33 66 99 198 396 495]. However other numbers still result in non-minimal sequences. – Ben Voigt Apr 29 '12 at 4:45

Here is my solution in C++ (may be trivially changed to C#):

void printSequenceTo(unsigned n)
{
    if (n == 1) { printf("1"); return; }
    if (n & 1) {
        int factor = 3;
        do {
            if (n % factor == 0) {
                printSequenceTo(n / factor * (factor-1));
                factor = 0;
                break;
            }
            factor += 2;
        } while (factor * factor <= n);
        if (factor) printSequenceTo(n-1);
    }
    else
        printSequenceTo(n/2);
    printf(",%u", n);
}

Demonstration: http://ideone.com/8lXxc

Naturally it could be sped up using a sieve for factorization.


Note, this is significant improvement over the accepted answer, but it still is not optimal.

share|improve this answer
    
so why does this algorithm work? – BrokenGlass Apr 29 '12 at 2:59
    
@BrokenGlass: It isn't minimal, unfortunately. It factors the number into primes, and produces a sequence of steps for each factor (multiplied by all earlier factors). So for say 35 = 5 * 7, it gets [1 2 4 5] and [1 2 4 6 7] * 5 combined into [1 2 4 5 10 20 30 35]. I think maybe I should instead be factoring into (2**n + 1), since my current output for 1025 is very bad. – Ben Voigt Apr 29 '12 at 3:02
    
Slight improvement, still not right: ideone.com/yVjFe – Ben Voigt Apr 29 '12 at 3:12
    
[1 2 4 8 16 32 33 66 99 198 396 495] looks like a shortest sequence, now how to get it? – Ben Voigt Apr 29 '12 at 3:16
    
I think this might be it: ideone.com/vrgfd – Ben Voigt Apr 29 '12 at 3:22

Here is my attempt. It may be optimised, but it shows my idea:

private static IEnumerable<int> OptimalSequence(int lastElement)
{
    var result = new List<int>();
    int currentElement = 1;
    do
    {
        result.Add(currentElement);
        currentElement = currentElement * 2;
    } while (currentElement <= lastElement);
    var realLastElement = result.Last();
    if (lastElement != realLastElement)
    {
        result.Add(lastElement);                
        FixCollection(result, lastElement - realLastElement);
    }
    return result;
}

private static void FixCollection(List<int> result, int difference)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < result.Count; i++)
    {
        if (result[i] == difference) break;
        if (result[i] > difference)
        {
            result.Insert(i, difference);
            FixCollection(result, difference - result[i-1]);
            break;
        }
    }
}

Edit I can't prove it formally but my answer and Chris Gessler's answer give sequences of the same size (at least I checked for numbers between 1 and 10000) because both algorithms compensate odd numbers. Some examples:

Number 1535
1,2,3,4,7,8,15,16,31,32,63,64,127,128,255,256,511,512,1024,1535
Number 2047
1,2,3,4,7,8,15,16,31,32,63,64,127,128,255,256,511,512,1023,1024,2047
Number 3071
1,2,3,4,7,8,15,16,31,32,63,64,127,128,255,256,511,512,1023,1024,2048,3071
Number 4095
1,2,3,4,7,8,15,16,31,32,63,64,127,128,255,256,511,512,1023,1024,2047,2048,4095
Number 6143
1,2,3,4,7,8,15,16,31,32,63,64,127,128,255,256,511,512,1023,1024,2047,2048,4096,6143
Number 8191
1,2,3,4,7,8,15,16,31,32,63,64,127,128,255,256,511,512,1023,1024,2047,2048,4095,4096,8191

==============

Number 1535
1,2,4,5,10,11,22,23,46,47,94,95,190,191,382,383,766,767,1534,1535
Number 2047
1,2,3,6,7,14,15,30,31,62,63,126,127,254,255,510,511,1022,1023,2046,2047
Number 3071
1,2,4,5,10,11,22,23,46,47,94,95,190,191,382,383,766,767,1534,1535,3070,3071
Number 4095
1,2,3,6,7,14,15,30,31,62,63,126,127,254,255,510,511,1022,1023,2046,2047,4094,4095
Number 6143
1,2,4,5,10,11,22,23,46,47,94,95,190,191,382,383,766,767,1534,1535,3070,3071,6142,6143
Number 8191
1,2,3,6,7,14,15,30,31,62,63,126,127,254,255,510,511,1022,1023,2046,2047,4094,4095,8190,8191
share|improve this answer
    
this is very good, but it still fails with an input of 310, the goal is to come up with the shortest sequence, 310 gives,{1,2,4,6,8,16,22,32,54,64,128,256,310}, 2+6 =8 , and 4+4 = 8, so 6 here can be removed. – user1362208 Apr 28 '12 at 16:21
    
6 cannot be removed because it's necessary for 22. – empi Apr 28 '12 at 16:26
    
sorry, you are right, but it still fails, can 54 be removed? i think its 54 that makes it fail. – user1362208 Apr 28 '12 at 16:32
    
54 is necessary for 128 – empi Apr 28 '12 at 16:34
    
64+64 =128, adding a number to itself is permissible. – user1362208 Apr 28 '12 at 16:35
public static int[] hit(int n)
    {
        List<int> nums = new List<int>();

        nums.Add(n);

        int x = 0;
        int Right = 0;
        int Left = 0;

        do
        {
            //even num
            if (n % 2 == 0)
            {
                x = n / 2;

                //result of division is also even 20/2 = 10 
                if (x % 2 == 0 || n>10 )
                {

                    nums.Add(x);

                    n = x;

                }
                else
                {
                    nums.Add(x + 1);
                    nums.Add(x - 1);

                    n = x - 1;
                }

            }
                //numbers that can only be divided by 3
            else if (n % 3 == 0)
            {
                x = n / 3;//46/3 =155

                 Right = x * 2;//155*2 = 310
                 Left = x;//155

                nums.Add(Right);
                nums.Add(Left);

                n = x;

            }
                //numbers that can only be divided by 5
            else
            {
                x = n / 2;
                Right = x + 1;
                Left = x;

                nums.Add(Right);
                nums.Add(Left);

                n = Left;
            }
        } while (n > 2);

        nums.Add(1);

        nums.Reverse();

        int[] arr = nums.ToArray();


        return arr;
    }
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