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Does anyone have any experience with the differences in file IO on different platforms? I wrote a LWJGL program that streams a 100+ MB TIFF file. The streaming happens fairly quickly on several Mac and Linux computers but on my 64 bit Windows 7 Desktop it seems to take several seconds for each tile of the map to load.

Basically, I create a 2D array of instances of a Tile class. Each tile is a 512x512 MB region of the TIFF file and the render method checks if the tile's region in memory has been loaded, if not, the loading gets queued up in a ThreadPoolExecutor, if it's been queued nothing happens, if it's loaded it is drawn. Access to the TIFF is handled by a TIFF class that reads the file with a RandomAccessFile instance. This is the function I use to read tiles from the TIFF

public BufferedImage getRasterTile(Rectangle area) {
    BufferedImage image = new BufferedImage(area.width, area.height,
            BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_RGB);
    try {
        long[] bytesPerSample = new long[bitsPerSample.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < bytesPerSample.length; i++) {
            bytesPerSample[i] += bitsPerSample[i] / 8 + bitsPerSample[i]
                    % 8 == 0 ? 0 : 1;
        }
        long bytesPerPixel = 0;
        for (long bits : bitsPerSample) {
            bytesPerPixel += bits / 8 + bits % 8 == 0 ? 0 : 1;
        }
        long bytesPerRow = bytesPerPixel * imageWidth;
        int strip, color;
        byte red, green, blue;
        for (int i = area.x; i < area.x + area.width; i++) {
            for (int u = area.y; u < area.y + area.height; u++) {
                if (i > 0 && u > 0 && i < imageWidth && u < imageLength) {
                    switch (planarConfiguration) {
                    case Chunky:
                        strip = (int) (u / rowsPerStrip);
                        seek(stripOffsets[strip]
                                + (u - strip * rowsPerStrip)
                                * bytesPerRow + i * bytesPerPixel);
                        red = readByte();
                        green = readByte();
                        blue = readByte();

                        color = (red & 0x0ff) << 16 | (green & 0x0ff) << 8
                                | (blue & 0x0ff);
                        image.setRGB(i - area.x, u - area.y, color);
                        break;
                    case Planar:
                        strip = (u / (int) rowsPerStrip);
                        seek(stripOffsets[strip] + i);
                        red = readByte();
                        seek(stripOffsets[strip + (int) imageLength] + i);
                        green = readByte();
                        seek(stripOffsets[strip + 2 * (int) imageLength]
                                + i);
                        blue = readByte();
                        color = (red & 0x0ff) << 16 | (green & 0x0ff) << 8
                                | (blue & 0x0ff);
                        image.setRGB(i - area.x, u - area.y, color);
                        break;
                    }
                } else {
                    image.setRGB(i - area.x, u - area.y, 0);
                }
            }
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
    return image;
}
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I am confused, are you saying that reading is slow (in which case can you show us how you are just reading the data) or the conversion is slow. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 28 '12 at 16:02

1 Answer 1

I suspect that it is to do with the way you are reading the file. I notice that you are repeatedly calling methods named readByte() and seek. If those methods are making calls on an unbuffered stream (or a RandomAccessFile instance), then you are probably making a huge number of system calls, and that would make your method very slow.

If this is the cause, then you should probably read the entire image file into a byte[], and use array indexing to fish out the bytes that you need. If the image file is too large to do that, then you'll need to restructure your code to reduce the seeking and read many bytes at a time.

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