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I can't seem to make a small example of this, but maybe someone's run into it before.

I have a class, Path, with a method void find() and when I try to instantiate an associative array of type int[string] inside the method, I get a linker error that looks like this:

/tmp/ccTF0A0c.o: In function `_D6object28__T16AssociativeArrayTAyaTiZ16AssociativeArray6rehashMFNdZHAyai':
game.d:(.text._D6object28__T16AssociativeArrayTAyaTiZ16AssociativeArray6rehashMFNdZHAyai[_D6object28__T16AssociativeArrayTAyaTiZ16AssociativeArray6rehashMFNdZHAyai]+0x44): undefined reference to `_D14TypeInfo_HAyai6__initZ'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

If I stick the associative array in the class's members, everything looks fine.

The code looks something like this:

class Path
{
    int[string] bar; // Here it works.
    void find()
    {
        int[string] foo; // Here it fails.
    }
}
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I can't reproduce, can you try compiling your example with void main() {}. Or rdmd --main game.d –  he_the_great Apr 28 '12 at 19:17
    
My example doesn't exhibit the problem; I can't seem to separate it from my relatively large project. –  nmichaels Apr 28 '12 at 19:55
    
Well, you're going to need to provide an example that actually fails, or it's going to be very hard to help you. It's possible that you have some weird linker issues with your local setup, it's possible that you've run into a compiler bug, and it's possible that you've just over-reduced your code and that there's a real problem in your code that we can't point out, because you've stripped out the code with the problem when you reduced your code. –  Jonathan M Davis Apr 29 '12 at 1:29
    
@nmichaels, can you isolate the problem in a SSCCE (sscce.org) please? –  DejanLekic Apr 29 '12 at 10:41
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2 Answers

I just had a very similar problem myself with a class storing an associative array of object values and string keys. Even though this example in the question above actually did compile (Line:3 int[string] bar; // Here it works.) for me it didn't, my compile would fail with this message:

/tmp/cc8XXyP6.o: In function `_D6object64__T16AssociativeArrayTAyaTC2px5pizza8graphics8textures8MaterialZ16AssociativeArray6rehashMFNdZHAyaC2px5pizza8graphics8textures8Material':
/usr/include/d2/4.6/object.di:366: undefined reference to `_D50TypeInfo_HAyaC2px5pizza8graphics8textures8Material6__initZ'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

Turns out I solved it myself just by initializing the array in the class's constructor with an AA literal [key:value] containing a single key/value pair and it worked fine.

Example: (Doesn't Compile)

class Cache {
    Material[string] dict;        
    ...
    Material load(string filename) {
        ... (File I/O and such)
        dict[filename] = loadedMaterial; //Compiler Error?
    }
}

Example: (DOES Compile)

class Cache {
    Material[string] dict;        
    ...
    this() {
        dict = ["notexture" : new Material()]; //Somehow makes all the difference
    }
    ...
    Material load(string filename) {
        ... (File I/O and such)
        dict[filename] = loadedMaterial; //Works fine
    }
}

Not quite the same problem I think but it might still be useful to someone stumbling around with the same error message, this was the first meaningful question I found after googling for an hour.

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Are you doing incremental compiles? The D compiler doesn't support that. [Opinion: The D language will never go mainstream due to this problem]

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Nope, compiling the whole thing in one go. –  nmichaels May 2 '12 at 13:40
    
If I recall correctly, there were performance problems with it because the compiler could take shortcuts when given all the data at once. But the compiler is capable of incremental compiles. –  he_the_great May 2 '12 at 18:16
    
This is inaccurate. DMD does incremental compiles, just use the -c option. That said, because it's so blazing fast, I never bother. –  Justin W May 2 '12 at 23:21
    
@JustinW you then need to also recompile the modules depending on the changed module and you need to do that manually –  ratchet freak May 3 '12 at 15:33
    
@ratchetfreak right, but determining what modules to recompile is traditionally the job of the make system, not the compiler. I think we can both agree that with DMD incremental compiles is generally unnecessary and pointless, but definitely possible. –  Justin W May 3 '12 at 15:42
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