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I am trying to look up the index or name of a data frame based on the maximum of the aggrate values of that data frame, for example:

df <- data.frame(
        id = 1:6, 
        v1 = c(3, 20, 34, 23, 23, 56),
        v2 = c(1, 3, 4, 10, 30, 40),
        v3 = c(20, 35, 60, 60, 70, 80))

  id v1 v2 v3  
1  1  3  1 20  
2  2 20  3 35  
3  3 34  4 60  
4  4 23 10 60  
5  5 23 30 70  
6  6 56 40 80  

> colSums(as.data.frame(df[[1]]))  
df[[1]]  
     21   

> colSums(as.data.frame(df[[2]]))  
df[[2]]   
    159   

> colSums(as.data.frame(df[[3]]))  
df[[3]]   
     88  

So for example the maximum result using colSums is 159, and I'm trying to figure out how to to return 'df[[2]]'

share|improve this question
    
You only have one data.frame here. What are you trying to get? The column with the highest sum? –  Ari B. Friedman Apr 28 '12 at 16:53
    
There appears to be a mistake in your analysis. The maximum column is v3 (or, as you've been doing, as.data.frame(df[[4]]). –  Ananda Mahto Apr 28 '12 at 17:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, you can simply run colSums directly on your data.frame

> colSums(df)
 id  v1  v2  v3 
 21 159  88 325 

Subsetting is easy too

> df[which.max(colSums(df))]
  v3
1 20
2 35
3 60
4 60
5 70
6 80

Or, if you just want the index, as implied in your first line:

> which.max(colSums(df))
v3 
 4 

Also note that if you expect there might be more than one column with the same maximum sum, and you want to return all of them, you can use which(colSums(df) == max(colSums(df))) instead of which.max, which only returns the first occurrence.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you that was exactly what i was looking for, and apologies for the error in the analysis. –  Sam35 Apr 28 '12 at 20:02

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