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I am trying to break up a program I have written into two source files but I am having trouble linking them and the error messages aren't making any sense to me.

I will provide a shortened version of the files with relevant information:

//grandiose.cpp:

#include "thingy.h"

int main() {}

//thingy.h:
#include<string>
int add (int x, int y);
char * parse_input_fragment(const string & ,const string & , size_t &, size_t &);

//thingy.cpp:
#include "thingy.h"

int add (int x, int y)
{
    return x+y;
}

char * parse_input_fragment(const string & objective,const string & input, size_t & first_finder, size_t & second_finder) {
    char * string_to_int_buffer = new char[64];
    first_finder = input.find(objective, first_finder);
    first_finder = (input.find('=', first_finder))+1;
    second_finder = input.find(';', first_finder);
    int y = 0;
    for(unsigned int x = first_finder; x < second_finder; x++) {
        if (  (input[x] != ' ') && (input[x] != '\n') ) {
            string_to_int_buffer[y] = input[x];
            y++;
        }
    }
    string_to_int_buffer[y] = '\0';
    first_finder = second_finder;
    return string_to_int_buffer;
}

The parse_input_fragment function compiles fine if I put it in grandiose.cpp but i get error messages when I split it up as described. I included the "add" function for testing purposes and that one compiles fine.

The error message I get is for the prototype in thingy.h: error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int

It's clearly marked as a character pointer return type and works when not split out of grandiose.cpp, so I am quite confused as to the problem here.

EDIT:

Ok, after moving the using namespace std; to the appropriate place and included the header guards as recommended those error messages disappeared but I am getting new ones which I am further confused about. I'll include the complete files and the error messages.

Error messages: province.obj : error LNK2005: "public: __thiscall province::province(void)" (??0province@@QAE@XZ) already defined in grandiose.obj

province.obj : error LNK2005: "public: __thiscall province::province(class std::basic_string,class std::allocator >,int * const)" (??0province@@QAE@V?$basic_string@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@V?$allocator@D@2@@std@@QAH@Z) already defined in grandiose.obj

    // grandiose.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
    //

    #include "stdafx.h"
    #include <vector>
    #include <ctime>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <fstream>
    #include <string>
    #include "market.h"

    int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
    {
        market England;
        ifstream reader;
        reader.open ("provinces.txt", ios::in);
        if (reader.is_open()) {  //check if txt file successfully opened
            cout << "\n\nprovinces.txt was successfully opened.\n\n";
        }
        else {
            cout << "\n\nfile was not successfully opened.\n\n";
            return (1);
        }
        string reader_buffer;
        while ( reader.good() ) { // while not end of file
            getline (reader, reader_buffer, '}'); // get one province's worth of data from txt file
            if (!reader_buffer.empty()) {
                parse_provinces (reader_buffer); // send data to be parsed
            }
        }
        add(1,2);
        return 0;
    }


    //market.h

    #include <iostream>
    #include <list>
    #include "province.h"
    using namespace std;

    class market
    {
        public:
        list<province> provinces;
    };

    //province.h

    #ifndef PROVINCE_H
    #define PROVINCE_H
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>

    using namespace std;

    int add (int x, int y);
    char * parse_input_fragment(const string & ,const string & , size_t &, size_t &);

    class province
    {
    public:
        province::province();
        province::province(string, int[]);
        unsigned int * rural_poor;
        unsigned int * urban_poor;
        unsigned int * max_mine_jobs;
        unsigned int * max_farm_jobs;
        unsigned int * employed_mine;
        unsigned int * employed_farm;
        unsigned int * employed_factory;
        string name;
    };
    province::province () {
        rural_poor = new unsigned int(0);
        urban_poor = new unsigned int(0);
        max_mine_jobs = new unsigned int(0);
        max_farm_jobs = new unsigned int(0);
        employed_mine = new unsigned int(0);
        employed_farm = new unsigned int(0);
        employed_factory = new unsigned int(0);
        name = "";
    }
    province::province (string name, int numbers[]) {
        province::name = name;
        cout << "This province is named " << province::name << endl;
        rural_poor = new unsigned int(numbers[0]);
        cout << "Rural poor = " << *rural_poor << endl;
        urban_poor = new unsigned int(numbers[1]);
        cout << "Urban poor = " << *urban_poor << endl;
        max_mine_jobs = new unsigned int(numbers[2]);
        cout << "Max mine jobs = " << *max_mine_jobs << endl;
        max_farm_jobs = new unsigned int(numbers[3]);
        cout << "Max farm jobs = " << *max_farm_jobs << endl;
    }

    province * parse_provinces(string);

    #endif

    //province.cpp

    #include "stdafx.h"
    #include "province.h"

    int add (int x, int y)
    {
        return x+y;
    }

    char * parse_input_fragment(const string & objective,const string & input, size_t & first_finder, size_t & second_finder) {
        char * string_to_int_buffer = new char[64];
        first_finder = input.find(objective, first_finder);
        first_finder = (input.find('=', first_finder))+1;
        second_finder = input.find(';', first_finder);
        int y = 0;
        for(unsigned int x = first_finder; x < second_finder; x++) {
            if (  (input[x] != ' ') && (input[x] != '\n') ) {
                string_to_int_buffer[y] = input[x];
                y++;
            }
        }
        string_to_int_buffer[y] = '\0';
        first_finder = second_finder;
        return string_to_int_buffer;
    }

    province * parse_provinces(string input) {
        size_t first_finder;
        size_t second_finder;
        char * string_to_int_buffer;
        int population_info[4];


        // find the name
        first_finder = input.find('=');
        string name;
        for(unsigned int x = 0; x < first_finder; x++) {
            if ((input[x] != ' ') && (input[x] != '\n')) {
                name.push_back(input[x]);
            }
        }

        // find the rural poor
        string_to_int_buffer = parse_input_fragment("rural_poor", input, first_finder, second_finder);
        population_info[0] = atoi(string_to_int_buffer);

        // find the urban poor
        string_to_int_buffer = parse_input_fragment("urban_poor", input, first_finder, second_finder);
        population_info[1] = atoi(string_to_int_buffer);

        // find max mine jobs
        string_to_int_buffer = parse_input_fragment("max_mine_jobs", input, first_finder, second_finder);
        population_info[2] = atoi(string_to_int_buffer);

        // find max farm jobs
        string_to_int_buffer = parse_input_fragment("max_farm_jobs", input, first_finder, second_finder);
        population_info[3] = atoi(string_to_int_buffer);

        delete[] string_to_int_buffer;
        string_to_int_buffer = NULL;
        province * current_province = new province(name, population_info);
        return current_province;
    }
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Even though you include <string>, you also need to use the std namespace to access the string type:

#include<string>
using namespace std;

The type string resides in the std namespace, so just typing string will not name a known type.

Alternatively, you can replace all occurrances of string with std::string in the header and use the using statement in the .cpp (actually this is the desired way of doing things as it avoids poisioning the global namespace with all std functions an types.

Jason's answer is also a good advice: protect your headers with include guards, so if you include the same header twise (e.g. indirectly), you will not have a compiler error due to multiple definitions (C++ has a one-definition rule: all classes can be defined only once). This is not a problem in your specific case, but a good thing to get in the habit of doing to avoid latter problems

share|improve this answer

Just as a matter of style when you start including multiple files, you should place a preprocessor guard at the top of your header files to prevent them from being included twice and causing parsing errors. For instance, you should place the following in all your headers:

//first thing at the top of the header
#ifndef THINGY_H
#define THINGY_H

//...the actual header code

//the very last line of the header
#endif //THINGY_H

That way, if during a code module's compile you end up with a header file being included twice , then the preprocessor will already have the header-guard token defined, and as a result, will not include the code from the second copy of the header.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this is a header guard issue: there is no diamond/recursive include here to cause a problem –  Attila Apr 28 '12 at 17:21
    
Yeah that was a typo, it is #include "thingy.h" in the file. –  r m Apr 28 '12 at 17:29

Move your implementation to cpp files or inline implemented constructor/methods in headers to resolve linker errors.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand what you mean, could you elaborate? –  r m Apr 28 '12 at 17:54
    
for exmaple constructor of province class is implemented in a header. if you precede it with an inline keyword, your problem will be fixed. –  Mohammad Apr 28 '12 at 17:58
    
that worked, much appreciated! –  r m Apr 28 '12 at 18:00

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