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What is so annoying about CSS when you add style in the css class, it may apply other element/class by itself.

What the best way to prevent that?

For example:

HTML:

<div class='main-content'>
    <p> Hello World </p> 
    <span> Test One </span>
    <div class='column'>
        <span> Test Two</span>
    </div> 
</div>

CSS:

.main-content span {
    background: #921192;
    color: white;
    padding: 3px 4px;
    margin: 0 5px;
}


.column  span {
    font-size:20px;
    text-transform:none;
    display:inline-block;
}​

I do not want "Test Two" <span> to have a background color.

Test: http://jsfiddle.net/szm9c/1/

share|improve this question
1  
Unfortunately, it is not possible to not inherit in CSS. If you don't want a specific span to not not have certain styles, you'll have to target it specifically and override the styles, or you'll have to target other spans (with a class, for example) and apply the styles to them. – Nadh Apr 28 '12 at 18:22
1  
@NADH the problem the OP describes is not actually a style inheritance problem, just a selector one. – Matt Ball Apr 28 '12 at 18:23
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use a selector that actually selects the elements you want. In this case >, the child selector, will suffice.

.main-content > span {
    background: #921192;
    color: white;
    padding: 3px 4px;
    margin: 0 5px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/mattball/mQFz2/

share|improve this answer
    
    
@MohammadAliAkbari your point? – Matt Ball Apr 28 '12 at 18:24
    
but I think this question can have more general answer. Its better to use classes... – Mohammad Ali Akbari Apr 28 '12 at 18:26

Use .main-content > span, that selects only directly descendent elements.

share|improve this answer

This has nothing to do with inheritance.

To use CSS properly, assign properties to elements using selectors that match only the elements that you wish to affect. (The example given is far too artificial for a useful analysis and for constructive suggestions on a better approach.)

share|improve this answer

You can use this

.main-content > span {
background: #921192;
color: white;
padding: 3px 4px;
margin: 0 5px;
}

If you use like .main-content > span that style will only affect to the immediate child spans of .main-content class

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