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I have an array:

t = [4, 5, 0, 7, 1, 6, 8, 3, 2, 9]

which is just a random shuffle of the range [0, 9]. I need to calculate this:

t2 = [9, 5, 7, 8, 7, 14, 11, 5, 11, 13]

which is just:

t2 = [t[0]+t[1], t[1]+t[2], t[2]+t[3], t[3]+t[4], ..., t[9]+t[0]]

Is there a way I can do this with numpy to avoid a python for loop when dealing with large arrays?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You could take advantage of a NumPy array's ability to sum element-wise:

In [5]: import numpy as np

In [6]: t = np.array([4, 5, 0, 7, 1, 6, 8, 3, 2, 9])

In [7]: t + np.r_[t[1:],t[0]]
Out[7]: array([ 9,  5,  7,  8,  7, 14, 11,  5, 11, 13])

np.r_ is one way to concatenate sequences together to form a new numpy array. As we'll see below, it turns out not to be the best way in this case.


Another possibility is:

In [10]: t + np.roll(t,-1)
Out[10]: array([ 9,  5,  7,  8,  7, 14, 11,  5, 11, 13])

It appears using np.roll is significantly faster:

In [11]: timeit t + np.roll(t,-1)
100000 loops, best of 3: 17.2 us per loop

In [12]: timeit t + np.r_[t[1:],t[0]]
10000 loops, best of 3: 35.5 us per loop
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Had to Google what np.r_ does :) Could you add the link and a brief explanation to the answer? –  ovgolovin Apr 28 '12 at 19:26
    
@ovgolovin: done! –  unutbu Apr 28 '12 at 19:36

You can do this pretty happily with zip(), a list slice, and a list comprehension:

t2 = [a+b for (a, b) in zip(t, t[1:])]
t2.append(t[0]+t[-1])

We need the extra append() to add in the last element, as zip() only works until the shortest iterator ends. A list comprehension is significantly faster than a normal for loop as it's implemented C-side in Python, rather than as a Python loop.

The alternative is to use itertools.zip_longest:

from itertools import zip_longest
t2 = [a+b for (a, b) in zip_longest(t, t[1:], fillvalue=t[0])]

To fill the extra value in. Do note that this function is itertools.izip_longest in Python 2.x.

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3  
@ovgolovin No, he asked to avoid a python loop, and a list comprehension is done as a loop in C within Python. This means it's significantly faster than a normal loop. –  Lattyware Apr 28 '12 at 19:19
3  
It will still incredibly suboptimal compared to Numpy vector operations. –  larsmans Apr 28 '12 at 19:21
1  
Please, reflect it in the answer. Because I think the reason why list comprehension is used is more important than the technical implementation details of the list comprehension. –  ovgolovin Apr 28 '12 at 19:23
1  
@larsmans I think it's OK to have this answer too. But it should be clearly reflected what are the upsides and the downsides of this solution. –  ovgolovin Apr 28 '12 at 19:31
1  
@Lattyware with numpy was from the very beginning. But the fact that OP does want numpy implementation doesn't mean that this answer can't come in handy to somebody who will face the same problem and will find this question here. –  ovgolovin Apr 28 '12 at 19:37

What about

import numpy as np
t = np.array([4, 5, 0, 7, 1, 6, 8, 3, 2, 9])

new_t = t + np.hstack((t[1:], [t[0]]))

Result:

>>> new_t
array([ 9,  5,  7,  8,  7, 14, 11,  5, 11, 13])
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+1 for another solution, although it is a little slower than the accepted answer. –  amillerrhodes Apr 28 '12 at 23:21

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