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The instructions are to:

The MyString object should overload the following operators:

1)Parenthesis operator should be overloaded to replace the Set and Get functions of your previous assignment. Note that both instances should issue exit(1) upon violation of the string array bounaries.

My .cpp file where the functions are defined:

 // My original set function to replace the character at the index passed in with the character passed in

 void MyString::Set(int index, char b)
 {
    if(String[index] == '\0')
    {
            exit(1);
    }
    else
    {

            String[index] = b;
    }


 }
 //original get function to get the character of the index passed in as argument
 char MyString::Get(int i)
 {

    if( String[i] == '\0')
    {
            exit(1);
    }
    else
    {
            return String[i];

    }
 }

How do I possibly transform this into an overloaded () operator function?? The most I've gotten is:

 MyString& MyString::operator()(const int index, const char b)
 {
    if(String[index] == '\0')
    {
            exit(1);
    }
    else
    {

            String[index] = b;
    }


}


char& MyString::operator()(const int i)
{

    if( String[i] == '\0')
    {
            exit(1);
    }
    else
    {
            return String[i];

    }
}

What am I doing wrong?

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2  
What isn't working right? Are you getting a compile error? A runtime crash? –  Ben Voigt Apr 28 '12 at 20:09
    
That's going to be akward to use. You would have like b(1,5); <- that sets 5 on index 1. You should always design your code so its intuitive, that operator overload doesn't seem intuitive at all. You could implement operator[] to serve that same purpose. –  mfontanini Apr 28 '12 at 20:15
    
This is one of the errors I am getting error: no match for âoperator[]â in â((MyString*)this)->MyString::String[index]â ?? –  user1363061 Apr 28 '12 at 20:32
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both Get and Set, and the two overloads of the () operator check for out of string error in an inappropriate (wrong!) manner. See, the i-th, or n-th element of a string can not be '\0' if the string is not that long. If you try to read memory beyond the current string length, you will probably get a read access violation.

Instead, you should check whether the given index is less then the string's length, and if it is, then return the element. Otherwise, it is out of bounds.

Another thing is that in the first overload of the () operator, you are using a string object to dereference a string array, which doesn't make much sense. Also, b should be a character there, not a string, since you are setting only one element.

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Your bounds checks are wrong, but you already had that problem in the original code.

Your index parameter mysteriously changed type from int to const MyString&, that looks wrong.

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so instead it should just be changed to const int index? –  user1363061 Apr 28 '12 at 20:33
    
Yes, that would help immensely. –  Ben Voigt Apr 28 '12 at 20:34
    
Great! I've made some changes above, can you tell me anything else that looks completely wrong? –  user1363061 Apr 28 '12 at 20:40
    
Thanks for all of your help, It works!! –  user1363061 Apr 28 '12 at 20:49
    
@user1363061: The bounds checking is still totally wrong. If index is out of bounds, then String[index] will fail, you can't then compare it to something. –  Ben Voigt Apr 28 '12 at 21:31
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