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What is the difference between a wait() and sleep() in Threads?

Is my understanding that a wait()-ing Thread is still in running mode and uses CPU cycles but a sleep()-ing does not consume any CPU cycles correct?

Why do we have both wait() and sleep(): how does their implementation vary at a lower level?

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6  
very good question. semantics of both are easy to confuse. –  Andreas Petersson Jun 24 '09 at 7:25
    
Very nice questions but they are 2 in one. Why do we have both is not the same as how they can (and not are!) implemented at a lower level. I've answered to that too. –  estani Apr 19 '12 at 10:39
    
Suppose a thread A is in a synchronized block , and while it is in the cpu from this thread is taken and given to another thread B. now in which state Thread A will go , will the other threads waiting on this synchronized block come inside now ? –  Peter Aug 17 '13 at 8:22
    
Here's a good article describing it: qat.com/using-waitnotify-instead-thread-sleep-java –  Triton Man Sep 27 '13 at 13:59
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23 Answers 23

up vote 267 down vote accepted

A wait can be "woken up" by another process calling notify on the monitor which is being waited on whereas a sleep cannot. Also a wait (and notify) must happen in a block synchronized on the monitor object whereas sleep does not:

Object mon = ...;
synchronized (mon) {
    mon.wait();
} 

At this point the currently executing thread waits and releases the monitor. Another thread may do

synchronized (mon) { mon.notify(); }

(On the same mon object) and the first thread (assuming it is the only thread waiting on the monitor) will wake up.

You can also call notifyAll if more than one thread is waiting on the monitor - this will wake all of them up. However, only one of the threads will be able to grab the monitor (remember that the wait is in a synchronized block) and carry on - the others will then be blocked until they can acquire the monitor's lock.

Another point is that you call wait on Object itself (i.e. you wait on an object's monitor) whereas you call sleep on Thread.

Yet another point is that you can get spurious wakeups from wait (i.e. the thread which is waiting resumes for no apparent reason). You should always wait whilst spinning on some condition as follows:

synchronized {
    while (!condition) { mon.wait(); }
}
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7  
A sleeping Thread can also be woken up by notify(). ? –  Geek Jun 24 '09 at 6:51
46  
No, it cannot. It can only be interrupted. –  Peter Štibraný Jun 24 '09 at 6:53
7  
No - a sleeping thread cannot be woken by notify –  oxbow_lakes Jun 24 '09 at 6:54
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@Geek - why in the world do you say wait() wastes CPU cycles? –  Robert Munteanu Jun 24 '09 at 7:04
6  
Interruption is intended as a mechanism to gently encourage a thread to stop running entirely and cancel remaining operations. wait/notify are typically used to wait for some other thread to accomplish a task, or to wait until a certain condition is satisfied. –  Louis Wasserman Jul 26 '12 at 11:40
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One key difference not yet mentioned is that while sleeping a Thread does not release the locks it holds, while waiting releases the lock on the object that wait() is called on.

synchronized(LOCK) {
    Thread.sleep(1000); // LOCK is held
}


synchronized(LOCK) {
    LOCK.wait(); // LOCK is not held
}
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37  
Waiting only releases the lock for the object you call wait() on. It doesn't release any other locks. –  Jon Skeet Jun 24 '09 at 7:18
    
@Jon Skeet: thanks, corrected. –  Robert Munteanu Jun 24 '09 at 7:20
7  
You don't actually need to call sleep from within a lock - locks and wait/notify go hand in hand but locks and sleep are unrelated. –  oxbow_lakes Jun 24 '09 at 7:21
3  
@oxbow_lakes - I'd say that you should not sleep with locks, there are few uses cases for that. Just wanted to point out the differences. –  Robert Munteanu Jun 24 '09 at 7:23
    
@oxbow_lakes - I think our edits overlapped so I rolled back to a previous version. –  Robert Munteanu Jun 24 '09 at 7:25
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I found this link helpful (which references this post). It puts the difference between sleep(), wait(), and yield() in human terms. (in case the links ever go dead I've included the post below with additional markup)

It all eventually makes its way down to the OS’s scheduler, which hands out timeslices to processes and threads.

sleep(n) says “I’m done with my timeslice, and please don’t give me another one for at least n milliseconds.” The OS doesn’t even try to schedule the sleeping thread until requested time has passed.

yield() says “I’m done with my timeslice, but I still have work to do.” The OS is free to immediately give the thread another timeslice, or to give some other thread or process the CPU the yielding thread just gave up.

.wait() says “I’m done with my timeslice. Don’t give me another timeslice until someone calls notify().” As with sleep(), the OS won’t even try to schedule your task unless someone calls notify() (or one of a few other wakeup scenarios occurs).

Threads also lose the remainder of their timeslice when they perform blocking IO and under a few other circumstances. If a thread works through the entire timeslice, the OS forcibly takes control roughly as if yield() had been called, so that other processes can run.

You rarely need yield(), but if you have a compute-heavy app with logical task boundaries, inserting a yield() might improve system responsiveness (at the expense of time — context switches, even just to the OS and back, aren’t free). Measure and test against goals you care about, as always.

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I don't like yield. It's not at the expense of system responsiveness. It's at the expense of differing behaviors between platforms: javamex.com/tutorials/threads/yield.shtml –  Pacerier Jul 20 '12 at 9:35
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There are a lot of answers here but I couldn't find the semantic distinction mentioned on any.

It's not about the thread itself; both methods are required as they support very different use-cases.

sleep() sends the Thread to sleep as it was before, it just packs the context and stops executing for a predefined time. So in order to wake it up before the due time, you need to know the Thread reference. This is not a common situation in a multi-threaded environment. It's mostly used for time-synchronization (e.g. wake in exactly 3.5 seconds) and/or hard-coded fairness (just sleep for a while and let others threads work).

wait(), on the contrary, is a thread (or message) synchronization mechanism that allows you to notify a Thread of which you have no stored reference (nor care). You can think of it as a publish-subscribe pattern (wait == subscribe and notify() == publish). Basically using notify() you are sending a message (that might even not be received at all and normally you don't care).

To sum up, you normally use sleep() for time-syncronization and wait() for multi-thread-synchronization.

They could be implemented in the same manner in the underlying OS, or not at all (as previous versions of Java had no real multithreading; probably some small VMs doesn't do that either). Don't forget Java runs on a VM, so your code will be transformed in something different according to the VM/OS/HW it runs on.

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There are some difference key notes i conclude after working on wait and sleep, first take a look on sample using wait() and sleep():

Example1: using wait() and sleep():

synchronized(HandObject) {
    while(isHandFree() == false) {
        /* Hand is still busy on happy coding or something else, please wait */
        HandObject.wait();
    }
}

/* Get lock ^^, It is my turn, take a cup beer now */
while (beerIsAvailable() == false) {
    /* Beer is still coming, not available, Hand still hold glass to get beer,
       don't release hand to perform other task */
    Thread.sleep(5000);
}

/* Enjoy my beer now ^^ */
drinkBeers();

/* I have drink enough, now hand can continue with other task: continue coding */
setHandFreeState(true);
synchronized(HandObject) {
    HandObject.notifyAll();
}

Let clarity some key notes:

  1. Call on:
    • wait(): Call on current thread that hold HandObject Object
    • sleep(): Call on Thread execute task get beer (is class method so affect on current running thread)
  2. Synchronized:
    • wait(): when synchronized multi thread access same Object (HandObject) (When need communication between more than one thread (thread execute coding, thread execute get beer) access on same object HandObject )
    • sleep(): when waiting condition to continue execute (Waiting beer available)
  3. Hold lock:
    • wait(): release the lock for other object have chance to execute (HandObject is free, you can do other job)
    • sleep(): keep lock for at least t times (or until interrupt) (My job still not finish, i'm continue hold lock and waiting some condition to continue)
  4. Wake-up condition:
    • wait(): until call notify(), notifyAll() from object
    • sleep(): until at least time expire or call interrupt
  5. And the last point is use when as estani indicate:

you normally use sleep() for time-syncronization and wait() for multi-thread-synchronization.

Please correct me if i'm wrong.

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This is a very simple question, because both these methods have a totally different use.

The major difference is to wait to release the lock or monitor while sleep doesn't release any lock or monitor while waiting. Wait is used for inter-thread communication while sleep is used to introduce pause on execution.

This was just a clear and basic explanation, if you want more than that then continue reading.

In case of wait() method thread goes in waiting state and it won't come back automatically until we call the notify() method (or notifyAll() if you have more then one thread in waiting state and you want to wake all of those thread). And you need synchronized or object lock or class lock to access the wait() or notify() or notifyAll() methods. And one more thing, the wait() method is used for inter-thread communication because if a thread goes in waiting state you'll need another thread to wake that thread.

But in case of sleep() this is a method which is used to hold the process for few seconds or the time you wanted. Because you don't need to provoke any notify() or notifyAll() method to get that thread back. Or you don't need any other thread to call back that thread. Like if you want something should happen after few seconds like in a game after user's turn you want the user to wait until the computer plays then you can mention the sleep() method.

And one more important difference which is asked often in interviews: sleep() belongs to Thread class and wait() belongs to Object class.

These are all the differences between sleep() and wait().

And there is a similarity between both methods: they both are checked statement so you need try catch or throws to access these methods.

I hope this will help you.

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sleep is a method of Thread, wait is a method of Object, so wait/notify is a technique of synchronizing shared data in Java (using monitor), but sleep is a simple method of thread to pause itself.

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source : http://www.jguru.com/faq/view.jsp?EID=47127

Thread.sleep() sends the current thread into the "Not Runnable" state for some amount of time. The thread keeps the monitors it has aquired -- i.e. if the thread is currently in a synchronized block or method no other thread can enter this block or method. If another thread calls t.interrupt() it will wake up the sleeping thread.

Note that sleep is a static method, which means that it always affects the current thread (the one that is executing the sleep method). A common mistake is to call t.sleep() where t is a different thread; even then, it is the current thread that will sleep, not the t thread.

t.suspend() is deprecated. Using it is possible to halt a thread other than the current thread. A suspended thread keeps all its monitors and since this state is not interruptable it is deadlock prone.

object.wait() sends the current thread into the "Not Runnable" state, like sleep(), but with a twist. Wait is called on an object, not a thread; we call this object the "lock object." Before lock.wait() is called, the current thread must synchronize on the lock object; wait() then releases this lock, and adds the thread to the "wait list" associated with the lock. Later, another thread can synchronize on the same lock object and call lock.notify(). This wakes up the original, waiting thread. Basically, wait()/notify() is like sleep()/interrupt(), only the active thread does not need a direct pointer to the sleeping thread, but only to the shared lock object.

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you should have mentioned that you copied and pasted this explanation from an external site. Your post has been edited, but you should mark the source if you copy-paste in the future, as these are NOT your own words (so this is really unethical). –  Sk8erPeter Jun 17 '13 at 10:45
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Wait and sleep are two different things:

  • In sleep() the thread stops working for the specified duration.
  • In wait() the thread stops working until the object being waited-on is notified, generally by other threads.
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but you can interrupt a sleeping Thread. In that case wait() is redundant infact it wastes CPU cycles too :-( –  Geek Jun 24 '09 at 6:54
6  
Wait doesn't waste CPU cycles. –  Peter Štibraný Jun 24 '09 at 6:55
1  
@Peter - I think it does. It waits() for its chunk of CPU cycles and then the OS gives the CPU cycles to other Threads. I think this might be OS dependant, I am not sure. –  Geek Jun 24 '09 at 6:58
2  
It would be very poor implementation of wait() if it wasted CPU cycles. wait/notify is used quite a lot for interthread communication. –  Peter Štibraný Jun 24 '09 at 7:00
1  
Mate, you were right :-) –  Geek Jun 24 '09 at 7:02
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sleep() is a method which is used to hold the process for few seconds or the time you wanted but in case of wait() method thread goes in waiting state and it won’t come back automatically until we call the notify() or notifyAll().

The major difference is that wait() releases the lock or monitor while sleep() doesn’t releases any lock or monitor while waiting. Wait is used for inter-thread communication while sleep is used to introduce pause on execution, generally.

Thread.sleep() sends the current thread into the “Not Runnable” state for some amount of time. The thread keeps the monitors it has acquired — i.e. if the thread is currently in a synchronized block or method no other thread can enter this block or method. If another thread calls t.interrupt() it will wake up the sleeping thread. Note that sleep is a static method, which means that it always affects the current thread (the one that is executing the sleep method). A common mistake is to call t.sleep() where t is a different thread; even then, it is the current thread that will sleep, not the t thread.

object.wait() sends the current thread into the “Not Runnable” state, like sleep(), but with a twist. Wait is called on an object, not a thread; we call this object the “lock object.” Before lock.wait() is called, the current thread must synchronize on the lock object; wait() then releases this lock, and adds the thread to the “wait list” associated with the lock. Later, another thread can synchronize on the same lock object and call lock.notify(). This wakes up the original, waiting thread. Basically, wait()/notify() is like sleep()/interrupt(), only the active thread does not need a direct pointer to the sleeping thread, but only to the shared lock object.

synchronized(LOCK) {   
   Thread.sleep(1000); // LOCK is held
}

synchronized(LOCK) {   
   LOCK.wait(); // LOCK is not held
}

Let categorize all above points :

Call on:

  • wait(): Call on an object; current thread must synchronize on the lock object.
  • sleep(): Call on a Thread; always currently executing thread.

Synchronized:

  • wait(): when synchronized multiple threads access same Object one by one.
  • sleep(): when synchronized multiple threads wait for sleep over of sleeping thread.

Hold lock:

  • wait(): release the lock for other objects to have chance to execute.
  • sleep(): keep lock for at least t times if timeout specified or somebody interrupt.

Wake-up condition:

  • wait(): until call notify(), notifyAll() from object
  • sleep(): until at least time expire or call interrupt().

Usage:

  • sleep(): for time-synchronization and;
  • wait(): for multi-thread-synchronization.

Ref:diff sleep and wait

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In simple words, wait is wait Until some other thread invokes you whereas sleep is "dont execute next statement" for some specified period of time.

Moreover sleep is static method in Thread class and it operates on thread, whereas wait() is in Object class and called on an object.

Another point, when you call wait on some object, the thread involved synchronize the object and then waits. :)

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Why do you need both ? Why sleep() is not sufficient ? –  Geek Jun 24 '09 at 6:53
    
Notify is used for communication between threads. To call wait, you need some object, synchronize on it, and then call wait on it. To be notified, you need other thread to synchronize on the same object, and call notify. –  Peter Štibraný Jun 24 '09 at 6:55
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The methods are used for different things.

Thread.sleep(5000);   // Wait until the time has passed.

Object.wait();        // Wait until some other thread tells me to wake up.

Thread.sleep(n) can be interrupted, but Object.wait() must be notified. It's possible to specify the maximum time to wait: Object.wait(5000) so it would be possible to use wait to, er, sleep but then you have to bother with locks.

Neither of the methods uses the cpu while sleeping/waiting.

The methods are implemented using native code, using similar constructs but not in the same way.

Look for yourself: Is the source code of native methods available? The file /src/share/vm/prims/jvm.cpp is the starting point...

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  • The method wait(1000) causes the current thread to sleep up to one second.
    • A thread could sleep less than 1 second if it receives the notify() or notifyAll() method call.
  • The call to sleep(1000) causes the current thread to sleep for exactly 1 second.
    • Also sleeping thread doesn't hold lock any resource. But waiting thread does.
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sleep(1000) doesn't guaranty to sleep for exactly 1 second. It may may be interrupted before. –  Lucio Jun 19 at 14:59
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wait and sleep methods are very different:

  • sleep has no way of "waking-up",
  • whereas wait has a way of "waking-up" during the wait period, by another thread calling notify or notifyAll.

Come to think about it, the names are confusing in that respect; however sleep is a standard name and wait is like the WaitForSingleObject or WaitForMultipleObjects in the Win API.

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But we can interrupt a sleep couldn't we? so what's the difference with that sleep/interrupt vs wait/notify ? –  Pacerier Feb 3 '12 at 9:01
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In my opinion, the main difference between both mechanisms is that sleep/interrupt is the most basic way of handling threads, whereas wait/notify is an abstraction aimed to do thread inter-communication easier. This means that sleep/interrupt can do anything, but that this specific task is harder to do.

Why is wait/notify more suitable? Here are some personal considerations:

  1. It enforces centralization. It allows to coordinate the communication between a group of threads with a single shared object. This simplifies the work a lot.

  2. It enforces synchronization. Because it makes the programmer wrap the call to wait/notify in a synchronized block.

  3. It's independent of the thread origin and number. With this approach you can add more threads arbitrarily without editing the other threads or keeping a track of the existing ones. If you used sleep/interrupt, first you would need to keep the references to the sleeping threads, and then interrupt them one by one, by hand.

An example from the real life that is good to explain this is a classic restaurant and the method that the personnel use to communicate among them: The waiters leave the customer requests in a central place (a cork board, a table, etc.), ring a bell, and the workers from the kitchen come to take such requests. Once that there is any course ready, the kitchen personnel ring the bell again so that the waiters are aware and take them to the customers.

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You are correct - Sleep() causes that thread to "sleep" and the CPU will go off and process other threads (otherwise known as context switching) wheras I believe Wait keeps the CPU processing the current thread.

We have both because although it may seem sensible to let other people use the CPU while you're not using it, actualy there is an overhead to context switching - depending on how long the sleep is for, it can be more expensive in CPU cycles to switch threads than it is to simply have your thread doing nothing for a few ms.

Also note that sleep forces a context switch.

Also - in general it's not possible to control context switching - during the Wait the OS may (and will for longer waits) choose to process other threads.

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wait() doesn't keep the CPU processing the current thread. It is like sleep in that it causes a context switch as well: javamex.com/tutorials/threads/context_switch.shtml. I've been asking for half a year all around stackoverflow and it seems like no one knows what's the difference between wait/notify vs sleep/interrupt. –  Pacerier Jul 20 '12 at 10:15
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Lets assume you are hearing songs.

As long as the current song is running, the next song wont play, i.e Sleep() called by next song

If you finish the song it will stop and until you select play button(notify()) it wont play, i.e wait() called by current song.

In this both cases songs going to Wait states.

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wait() is given inside a synchronized method whereas sleep() is given inside a non-synchronized method because wait() method release the lock on the object but sleep() or yield() does release the lock().

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One potential big difference between sleep/interrupt and wait/notify is that

Generating an exception when not needed is inefficient. If you have threads communicating with each other at a high rate, then it would be generating a lot of exceptions if you were calling interrupt all the time, which is a total waste of CPU.

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sleep() method causes the current thread to move from running state to block state for a specified time. If the current thread has the lock of any object then it keeps holding it, which means that other threads cannot execute any synchronized method in that class object.

wait() method causes the current thread to go into block state either for a specified time or until notify, but in this case the thread releases the lock of the object (which means that other threads can execute any synchronized methods of the calling object.

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Actually, all this is clearly described in Java docs (but I realized this only after reading the answers).

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/index.html :

wait() - The current thread must own this object's monitor. The thread releases ownership of this monitor and waits until another thread notifies threads waiting on this object's monitor to wake up either through a call to the notify method or the notifyAll method. The thread then waits until it can re-obtain ownership of the monitor and resumes execution.

sleep() - Causes the currently executing thread to sleep (temporarily cease execution) for the specified number of milliseconds, subject to the precision and accuracy of system timers and schedulers. The thread does not lose ownership of any monitors.

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Here wait() will be in the waiting state till it notify by another Thread but where as sleep() will be having some time..after that it will automatically transfer to the Ready state...

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Wait() and sleep() Differences?

Thread.sleep() Once its work completed then only its release the lock to everyone. until its never release the lock to anyone.

  Sleep() take the key, its never release the key to anyone, when its work completed then only its release then only take the key waiting stage threads.

Object.wait() When its going to waiting stage, its will be release the key and its waiting for some of the seconds based on the parameter.

For Example:

you are take the coffee in yours right hand, you can take another anyone of the same hand, when will your put down then only take another object same type here. also. this is sleep() you sleep time you didn't any work, you are doing only sleeping.. same here also.

wait(). when you are put down and take another one mean while you are waiting , that's wait

you are play movie or anything in yours system same as player you can't play more than one at a time right, thats its here, when you close and choose another anyone movie or song mean while is called wait

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