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How can I populate an array or list with sums that don't go higher than 10? I could do this with 3 arrays where 2 of them hold random numbers which the answer is not higher than 10, and a 3rd array to have the answers in it.

But that's kind of an ugly way of doing this.

To be more clear with what I want:

1 + 1 = 2
5 + 5 = 10
3 + 2 = 5

etc etc

The user only gets to see the 1 + 1 at first. And when the time is up, the user gets to see the answer.

So does anyone has another solution then what I'm about to tryout?

share|improve this question
    
typo, sorry my bad. –  Yustme Apr 28 '12 at 21:52
    
could you generate them on the fly, num1 = Random(0,10), num2 = Random(0, 10-num1)? –  Prescott Apr 28 '12 at 21:56
1  
I guess I'm not sure what the usage is, why do you need to store the answers? couldn't you just calculate those on the fly? –  Prescott Apr 28 '12 at 21:57
    
Yea that's a possibility, but the sum will be presented in a label (string). Doing all those convertings string/int etc is just too much overhead. –  Yustme Apr 28 '12 at 22:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Most likely you are trying to do something like this. This compiled but is untested. Noted how to create these pairs using the random number generator and subtraction.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {

        struct addition_pairs{
            public int first;
            public int second;
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        { 

         List<addition_pairs> main_list;
         main_list = new List<addition_pairs>();
       //TODO call populate_list and choose how many sets you want.

        }

        private void populate_list(int how_many, List<addition_pairs> list)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < how_many; i++)
            {
                Random random = new Random();
                int randomNumber1 = random.Next(0, 10);
                addition_pairs insert = new addition_pairs();
                insert.first = randomNumber1;
                insert.second = random.Next(0, 10-randomNumber1);
                list.Add(insert);
            }

        }
    }
}

EDIT: FIXED so it doesn't add to 10 every time LOL. I passed math i promise

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks, this looks promising, I'll try this out and let you know how it worked out. thanks! –  Yustme Apr 28 '12 at 22:11

You can use a 2D array.

int numSums = 4;
int[,] sums = new int[numSums,3];

// 1 + 1 = 2
sums[0,0] = 1;
sums[0,1] = 1;
sums[0,2] = sums[0,0] + sums[0,1];

// 5 + 5 = 10
sums[1,0] = 5;
sums[1,1] = 5;
sums[1,2] = sums[1,0] + sums[1,1];

// 3 + 2 = 5
sums[2,0] = 3;
sums[2,1] = 2;
sums[2,2] = sums[2,0] + sums[2,1];

// 2 + 2 = 4
sums[3,0] = 2;
sums[3,1] = 2;
sums[3,2] = sums[3,0] + sums[3,1];

You can also use a class to achieve the the cleanest effect.

private List<Equation> sums = new List<Equation>();

public MyConstructor() {
    sums.Add(new Equation(5, 5));
    Console.WriteLine (sums[0].a + " + " + sums[0].b  + " = " + sums[0].sum);
}

private class Equation {
    public int a;
    public int b;

    public int sum { 
        get { return a + b; } 
    }

    public Equation(int a, int b) {
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, but I have to create like 20 of those sums on the fly. Writing them all out would be even crazier then what i was gonna do initally. –  Yustme Apr 28 '12 at 22:08
    
The best thing to do here if you can't do it on the fly for some reason is to use a class (see edit to my original answer). –  xeorem Apr 28 '12 at 22:32
    
Hi, thanks, this does look clean. –  Yustme Apr 29 '12 at 9:52

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