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This is driving me nuts, it keeps returning 0

substr_count('df
d
fd
f
df', '\n');

if I use a letter like "d", it works fine

substr_count('df
d
fd
f
df', 'd');

Can anyone shed some light on this?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to use double quotes for control characters:

var_dump(substr_count('df
d
fd
f
df', "\n"));
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for f sake, thanks! –  Rob Apr 28 '12 at 22:14
    
@Rob: lol, no problem! –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '12 at 22:27
    
Why the downvote? –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '12 at 23:56
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'\n' is not the same as "\n". '\n' is text comprising a slash and the letter "n", whereas "\n" is a newline character.

Suggest you read the relevant section of the PHP manual about strings, particularly where it talks about single and double quoted strings.

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In addition to Alix and Mark: please use PHP_EOL instead of \n. Newlines differ on the different platforms (Windows/Linux/Mac), but PHP_EOL is always right. See this question for more info on the subject: When do I use the PHP constant "PHP_EOL"?

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Humm... I would argue that \n is safer in general because it's present in both \n and \r\n, the exception would be \r (old Mac). If the input string comes from a *nix system (\n) and the server runs on Windows (\r\n), PHP_EOL will not work. To be on the safe side, I always normalize newlines to \n with the following regex: $str = preg_replace('~\r\n?~', "\n", $str);. –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '12 at 22:18
    
@AlixAxel Hmm, seems true for input, according to this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/4975441/251760 Didn't knew that, thanks for your comment! –  Jonathan Apr 28 '12 at 22:21
    
Yup, you're welcome. =) –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '12 at 22:26
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