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I noticed that you can't have abstract constants in PHP.

Is there a way I can force a child class to define a constant (which I need to use in one of the abstract class internal methods) ?

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A constant it full scope once set its available in every class, function method or what-not. it makes no sense, please provide some code to explain abit more. –  Lawrence Cherone Apr 29 '12 at 0:10
1  
Either define a constant in the abstract class (thus every child class has a constant, even if it does not define its own), or use an abstract function (which forces every child class to define its own). Edit: the short answer to your question is no. –  halfer Apr 29 '12 at 0:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

A constant is a constant; there is no abstract or private constants in PHP as far as I know, but you can have a work around:

Sample Abstract Class

abstract class Hello {
    const CONSTANT_1 = 'abstract'; // Make Abstract
    const CONSTANT_2 = 'abstract'; // Make Abstract
    const CONSTANT_3 = 'Hello World'; // Normal Constant
    function __construct() {
        Enforcer::__add(__CLASS__, get_called_class());
    }
}

This would run fine

class Foo extends Hello {
    const CONSTANT_1 = 'HELLO_A';
    const CONSTANT_2 = 'HELLO_B';
}
new Foo();

Bar would return Error

class Bar extends Hello {
    const CONSTANT_1 = 'BAR_A';
}
new Bar();

Songo would return Error

class Songo extends Hello {

}
new Songo();

Enforcer Class

class Enforcer {
    public static function __add($class, $c) {
        $reflection = new ReflectionClass($class);
        $constantsForced = $reflection->getConstants();
        foreach ($constantsForced as $constant => $value) {
            if (constant("$c::$constant") == "abstract") {
                throw new Exception("Undefined $constant in " . (string) $c);
            }
        }
    }
}
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2  
That's not a constant, that's a function. –  Zombaya Apr 29 '12 at 0:07
4  
:) I reconsider, have an upvote instead. –  Zombaya Apr 29 '12 at 0:23
1  
@Baba good work around :) But does that mean that for every constant there is going to be an if statement? –  Songo Apr 29 '12 at 0:38
1  
@Songo .. you can see updated code .. its already working for normal and abstract .... i change the keywords so you can understand –  Baba Apr 29 '12 at 22:16
2  
My comment includes two suggestions for a better solution. Also, if you know your solution is only a Proof-of-Concept and not to be used in production, the answer should say so. People coming to SO usually seek help for real problems they face in production. But they don't necessarily know something is bad practise, a hack or just for "educational purpose". Unless told so. That's why I am pointing it out. –  Gordon Oct 27 '12 at 11:04

Unfortunately not... a constant is exactly what it says on the tin, constant. Once defined it can't be redefined, so in that way, it is impossible to require its definition through PHP's abstract inheritance or interfaces.

However... you could check to see if the constant is defined in the parent class's constructor. If it doesn't, throw an Exception.

abstract class A
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        if (!defined('static::BLAH'))
        {
            throw new Exception('Constant BLAH is not defined on subclass ' . get_class($this));
        }
    }
}

class B extends A
{
    const BLAH = 'here';
}

$b = new B();

This is the best way I can think of doing this from your initial description.

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A constant's value can be overridden in a child class. Constants are not immune to that sort of redefinition. –  Brilliand Feb 12 at 19:21

As far as I know "NO" :)

You could try other ways such as abstract methods:

abstract class Fruit
{
    abstract function getName();
    abstract function getColor();

    public function printInfo()
    {
        echo "The {$this->getName()} is {$this->getColor()}";
    }
}

class Apple extends Fruit
{
    function getName() { return 'apple'; }
    function getColor() { return 'red'; }

    //other apple methods
}

class Banana extends Fruit
{
    function getName() { return 'banana'; }
    function getColor() { return 'yellow'; }

    //other banana methods
}  

or static members:

abstract class Fruit
{
    protected static $name;
    protected static $color;

    public function printInfo()
    {
        echo "The {static::$name} is {static::$color}";
    }
}

class Apple extends Fruit
{
    protected static $name = 'apple';
    protected static $color = 'red';

    //other apple methods
}

class Banana extends Fruit
{
    protected static $name = 'banana';
    protected static $color = 'yellow';

    //other banana methods
} 

Source: http://www.sitepoint.com/forums/showthread.php?629565-Abstract-constants

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If you copy code from elsewhere on the web, make sure you are also citing the source. The above code was taken from sitepoint.com/forums/showthread.php?629565-Abstract-constants –  Gordon Oct 27 '12 at 10:16

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