Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to do something like this in a CASE WHEN in my query but it is not taking the AND part, it says its an error in the syntax, it would not take && either. I would appreciate any help as I am not to much of a SQL guru..

   Total =
               CASE Payment.ID
                    WHEN 1 THEN  mytable.Total
                    WHEN 4 AND trans.Amount IS NULL THEN mytable.Total
                    WHEN 4 AND trans.Amount IS NOT NULL THEN mytable.Total - trans.Amount
                    ELSE '0'
               END,
share|improve this question
    
I actually don't see any variables in use here, error in title or did you leave out or change some of your code? – Aaron Bertrand Apr 29 '12 at 5:24
    
No i think someone changed it for me... – user710502 Apr 29 '12 at 6:03
    
I changed it.. dont know who changed it to say i was using "variables" – user710502 Apr 29 '12 at 6:05
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is one way to do it. Change the expression to something like this.

Script:

Total = (CASE 
            WHEN Payment.ID = 1
                THEN  mytable.Total
            WHEN Payment.ID = 4 
                AND trans.Amount IS NULL 
                    THEN mytable.Total
            WHEN Payment.ID = 4 
                AND trans.Amount IS NOT NULL 
                    THEN mytable.Total - trans.Amount
            ELSE '0'
        END),

There are two types of CASE expression namely Simple and Searched. You cannot combine Simple and Searched in the same expression.

Simple:

CASE input
    WHEN 1 THEN 'a'
    WHEN 2 THEN 'b'
    WHEN 3 THEN 'c'
    ELSE ''
END

Searched - Example 1: In the simplest form.

CASE 
    WHEN input = 1 THEN 'a'
    WHEN input = 2 THEN 'b'
    WHEN input = 3 THEN 'c'
    ELSE ''
END

Searched - Example 2: Involving multiple columns. You can add multiple columns in each of the WHEN statements.

CASE 
    WHEN input = 1 AND second_column = 2 THEN 'a'
    WHEN input = 2 AND third_column  = 3 THEN 'b'
    WHEN input = 3 AND (second_column = 4 OR third_column = 6) THEN 'c'
    ELSE ''
END
share|improve this answer
    
Might be worth pointing out the advantage of searched - that the conditions don't all have to involve the same column (input), and can be arbitrarily complex. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 29 '12 at 3:31

I think this is a much simpler way to express the same query:

Total = CASE Payment.ID
  WHEN 1 THEN myTable.Total
  WHEN 4 THEN myTable.Total - COALESCE(trans.Amount, 0)
  ELSE 0
END,

We only really need one conditional for Payment.ID = 4 since there are only two possible outcomes (we're either going to subtract trans.Amount or we're not, and we can simplify this by using COALESCE (or ISNULL)). Of course there are other ways to express it as well, and they all have their merits. If myTable.Total is actually a more complex expression then it may be more efficient, at least in terms of keystrokes, to only mention that expression once, which you can do by shuffling the logic around a bit:

Total = CASE WHEN Payment.ID IN (1,4)
  THEN myTable.Total - CASE WHEN Payment.ID = 4 THEN
    COALESCE(trans.Amount, 0) ELSE 0 END
  ELSE 0
END,

The closest valid syntax to your original code is:

Total = CASE 
  WHEN Payment.ID = 1 THEN 
    myTable.Total
  WHEN Payment.ID = 4 AND trans.Amount IS NULL THEN 
    myTable.Total
  WHEN Payment.ID = 4 AND trans.Amount IS NOT NULL NULL THEN
    mytable.Total - trans.Amount
  ELSE
    0
END,

But in this case you have a lot of repetition in there, and you mention one expression three times. In some cases this can be detrimental to performance (imagine if that expression was expensive to calculate, such as a subquery or UDF call, and the query logic caused it to be calculated more than once). Sometimes the engine is going to do what the engine is going to do, no matter how much you try to outsmart it, but you can certainly lead it down the wrong path if you're not careful.

The key is to understand that CASE is an expression that returns a single value. Many people come from other languages and assume it is a statement that can be used for control of flow.

share|improve this answer
    
Your "more simply" query subtracts trans.Amount when it shouldn't - specifically, when Payment.ID = 1. Unless I missed something in the question, the simpler query will give the wrong result when ID = 1 and Amount isn't null or zero. – Steve Kass Apr 29 '12 at 4:46
    
Totally right Steve, good catch! Removed that version altogether. – Aaron Bertrand Apr 29 '12 at 4:54
    
What does COALESCE do? – user710502 Apr 29 '12 at 6:04
    
COALESCE returns the first non-NULL expression. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190349(v=sql.100).aspx – Aaron Bertrand Apr 29 '12 at 6:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.