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I just read that

Some buffered output classes support autoflush, specified by an optional constructor argument. When autoflush is enabled, certain key events cause the buffer to be flushed. For example, an autoflush PrintWriter object flushes the buffer on every invocation of println or format.

So if I am keeping the reference of any BufferReader for some time being and it gets flushed , then how all the data will be retained back? Is there some call back mechanism that will automatically flush it and again read the content or will I lose the data and again I need to call for it?

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You are confusing output buffering and flushing with input buffering. There is no flushing on input. A BufferedReader cannot be flushed. Your question is meaningless. –  EJP Apr 29 '12 at 7:17

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So if I am keeping the reference of any BufferReader for some time being and it gets flushed , then how all the data will be retained back?

I think you mean BufferedWriter. (Neither the Reader or InputStream APIs have a flush() method. Flushing doesn't make any sense on a "source".)

The flushed data is written to the stream's "sink"; i.e. the file or socket or whatever. So if you look in the file (or whatever), the data will be there if the stream has been flushed (successfully).

Is there some call back mechanism that will automatically flush it and again read the content

There is no callback mechanism1. (At least, not in any of the buffered stream classes that the standard class library provides: who knows what a custom class might do ...)

Data is flushed automatically when certain things happen. For example, when the application calls println ... for a PrintWriter.

... or will I lose the data and again I need to call for it?

This doesn't make sense, either grammatically or semantically. I don't know what you are trying to ask.

Perhaps you don't understand what flushing does. Flushing simply means pushing the data out of the buffers and out to wherever the stream sends its data. An explicit flush() call or an automatic flush just means "write it NOW".


1 - Incidentally, BufferedWriter doesn't have a finalize() method either. This means that if one of these objects becomes unreachable while it still has output buffered, that output will never be written.

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yes Now I gotcha the exact usage of flush .. thanks –  ABC Apr 29 '12 at 6:33

I think you're getting confused between buffered readers and writers. Your statement is talking about buffered writers, so if you're writing out to a stream then you shouldn't really care whether it is physically written or only written to the buffer - it doesn't matter to Java.

I would hope that a buffered reader would never be flushed, but depending on the type of buffer it might be OK. For example, if reading from a file, the buffer could be flushed and the file would just need to be re-read from the file system when you try to read(). However, for other streaming content, you wouldn't want it to be automatically flushed, as you would lose whatever data was in the buffer.

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