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public void GetProps(Parent p){

   // want to access lots of child properties here
   string childProp1 = p.prop1;
   bool childProp2 = p.prop2;
   bool childProp3 = p.prop3;

}

However compiler complains that

"Parent does not contain definition prop1"

The function would take in different subtypes of Class Parent.

All the subclasses have this

public override string prop1 { get; set; }

Is there a way of accomplishing this?

EDIT: To make the question clearer

I current have a giant if-elseif where i do something like

if(p is Child0){
      Child0 ch = p as Child0; 

       // want to access lots of child properties here
       string childProp1 = ch.prop1;
       bool childProp2 = ch.prop2;
       bool childProp3 = ch.prop3;

}else if(p is Child1){
      Child1 ch = p as Child1; 

       // want to access lots of child properties here
       string childProp1 = ch.prop1;
       bool childProp2 = ch.prop2;
       bool childProp3 = ch.prop3;

}else if(...// and many more 

Now I wanted to remove all the redundant code and make one function that can handle all this.

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I've answered as best I can given the sketchy information - if you could give more context about what you're trying to achieve, that would really help. –  Jon Skeet Apr 29 '12 at 8:09
1  
How are you using the keyword ref as a variable parameter? –  Darren Davies Apr 29 '12 at 8:12
    
@DarrenDavies edited by question –  Kevin Boyd Apr 29 '12 at 8:16
    
we need to see the Parent definition, not the child ones; is prop1 declared in the Parent class as public? –  Michael Edenfield Apr 29 '12 at 8:19
    
@MichaelEdenfield: have commented on this in Jon's answer. –  Kevin Boyd Apr 29 '12 at 8:28

4 Answers 4

If all child classes need to have the properties (but with different implementations), you should declare them as abstract properties in the base class (Parent), then implement them in the child classes.

If some derived classes won't have those properties, then what would you expect your current GetProps to do?

EDIT: If you're using C# 4 and you definitely can't get a better class design (where the parent class declares the property) you could use dynamic typing:

public void GetProps(Parent p) {
    dynamic d = p;
    string childProp1 = d.prop1;
    bool childProp2 = d.prop2;
    bool childProp3 = d.prop3;
    // ...    
}

I'd treat this as a last resort though...

share|improve this answer
    
sorry Jon, I'm not a good writer but I added more details to my question. Also I'm accessing this on an external dll and I dont have access to source. –  Kevin Boyd Apr 29 '12 at 8:17
    
@KevinBoyd: I doubt that the subclasses have override unless the property is actually in the base class... If you could give a short but complete example it would really help. –  Jon Skeet Apr 29 '12 at 8:19
    
Jon, the inheritance line is quite long. And I'm using the reference of the toplevel parent, eg Parent ---> SubP10 ----> SubP9 ---> SubP8 ...-----> Child. Any of the parents may have the definiton of prop1. –  Kevin Boyd Apr 29 '12 at 8:27
    
@KevinBoyd: So you need to give us a representative example - which your current question isn't. If Parent doesn't declare prop1, what would you expect your code to do if it were given an instance of a type which doesn't have it? –  Jon Skeet Apr 29 '12 at 8:40
3  
@Kevin: Then that is the type your method should take, rather than Parent –  Jon Skeet Apr 29 '12 at 9:15

If the property is defined in an intermediate class between parent and child and you don't have a reference to that intermediate class at design time then you could use reflection to get the property. But it sounds like you should be using the most relevant sub parent instead of simply parent.

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Nice idea! An example would help though! Reflection and Dynamic as Jon mentiond seem to be existing options. –  Kevin Boyd Apr 29 '12 at 9:25

As I understood from your question, you want to access Children Class members from object of Parent Class.

This behavior is not allowed in OOP. One way can be as suggested by Jon Skeet to create a Abstract base class and implement the required members in Children Classes.

Other way round can be to assign the required values to members of base class in derived class constructor using base construct. I do not know this will solve your problem or not. But Consider the following snippet for example:

 public class BaseClass
{
    public string FirstName = "Base Class";
    public string LastName = "Base Class";
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass()
    {
        base.LastName = "Derived Class";
    }
}

internal class Tester
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BaseClass objBaseClass = new BaseClass();
        Console.WriteLine("First Name : " + objBaseClass.FirstName);
        Console.WriteLine("Last Name : " + objBaseClass.LastName);

        DerivedClass objDerivedClass = new DerivedClass();
        Console.WriteLine("First Name : " + objDerivedClass.FirstName);
        Console.WriteLine("Last Name : " + objDerivedClass.LastName);

        BaseClass objBaseDerivedClass = new DerivedClass();
        Console.WriteLine("First Name : " + objBaseDerivedClass.FirstName);
        Console.WriteLine("Last Name : " + objBaseDerivedClass.LastName);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

O/P First Name : Base Class

Last Name : Base Class

First Name : Base Class

Last Name : Derived Class

First Name : Base Class

Last Name : Derived Class

Let me know, if it helps out.

share|improve this answer
    
Pank, thanks for the explanation, but in this case I'm accesing an external library and don't have access to modify the source. Also I want to access child properties from a parent reference. The objects that come in would still be child objects. –  Kevin Boyd Apr 29 '12 at 9:02

If I understood you correctly (- I'm assuming Parent is a base class from which Child0 Child1 etc inherit.) – you're just missing a declaration of prop1 in the parent. It won't get in the way, it will simply be overridden.

Check out this example (which returns "child string") and note that child is passed to a method that expects a ParentClass instance.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        ChildClass child = new ChildClass();
        Text = ParentClass.mymethod(child);
    }
}

class ParentClass
{
    public virtual string s { get { return "parent string"; }  }

    public static string mymethod(ParentClass parent)
    {
        return parent.s;
    }
}

class ChildClass : ParentClass
{
    public override string s { get { return "child string"; }  }
}
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