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I am trying to figure out why my app uses lots of memory and then crashes after several Memory Warnings. Instrument VM Tracker shows that it uses ˜30Mb as Dirty memory. Allocations shows 10-15 Mb which is not that much. As soon as the app deals with showing lots of images (thumbnails) I supposed that images is what I should look at. I don`t use standard UIImage imageNamed method instead I use imageWithData and do caching. When the system sends Memory warning I clean the cache storage. To be sure that images I create are being destroyed when they are no longer needed I subclassed UIImage and overrided imageWithData, release and dealloc methods. I can see imageWithData called but release and dealloc are never called. That is how I do this:

BaseUIimage.h

@interface BaseUIimage : UIImage

@end

BaseUIimage.m

#import "BaseUIimage.h"

@implementation BaseUIimage

+ (id)imageWithData:(NSData *)data {
    NSLog(@"UIImage imageWithData");
    return [UIImage imageWithData:data];
}

- (id)retain {
    NSLog(@"UIImage retain: %d", [self retainCount]);
    return [super retain];
}

- (oneway void)release {
    NSLog(@"UIImage release: %d", [self retainCount]);
    [super release];
}

- (id)autorelease {
    NSLog(@"UIImage autorelease: %d", [self retainCount]);
    return [super autorelease];
}

- (void)dealloc {
    NSLog(@"UIImage deallocated");
    [super dealloc];
}

@end

My caching code:

.h

#import "BaseUIimage.h"

@interface UIImageCached : BaseUIimage

// CACHE
+ (NSMutableDictionary*) cache;
+ (void) cleanCache;
+ (UIImageCached *)imageNamed:(NSString *)imageName;
+ (UIImageCached *)retinaImageNamed:(NSString *)imageName;
+ (UIImageCached *)imageFromPath:(NSString *)imagePath;

.m

#import "UIImageCached.h"

@implementation UIImageCached

static NSMutableDictionary *data;

+ (NSMutableDictionary*) cache {
    if (data == nil)
        data = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithCapacity:150];
    return data;
}

+ (void) cleanCache {
    NSLog(@"Cache cleaned images: %d", data.count);

    for (BaseUIimage *image in data) {
        NSLog(@"image rc: %d", [image retainCount]); // always prints rc = 1
    }

    [data removeAllObjects];
}

+ (UIImageCached *)imageFromPath:(NSString *)imagePath {
    UIImageCached *image = (UIImageCached*)[self.cache objectForKey:imagePath];
    if (image == nil) {
        NSData *imageData = [[NSData alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:imagePath options:NSDataReadingMappedIfSafe error:nil];
        image = (UIImageCached*)[UIImageCached imageWithData:imageData];
        [imageData release];

        if (image) {
            [self.cache setObject:image forKey:imagePath];
            //NSLog(@"new cached image: #%d", self.cache.count);
        } else {
            //NSLog(@"can't cache image: #%d", self.cache.count);
        }
    }

    return image;
}

+ (UIImageCached *)imageNamed:(NSString *)imageName {
    NSString *extension = [imageName pathExtension];
    NSString *fileName = [imageName stringByDeletingPathExtension];
    NSString *fileLocation = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:fileName ofType:extension];
    return [self imageFromPath:fileLocation];
}

+ (UIImageCached *)retinaImageNamed:(NSString *)imageName {
    UIImageCached *image = (UIImageCached*)[self.cache objectForKey:imageName];
    if (image == nil) {
        NSString *extension = [imageName pathExtension];
        NSString *fileName = [imageName stringByDeletingPathExtension];

        float s = 1.0;

        // retina filename support
        if(!isIPAD && [[UIScreen mainScreen] respondsToSelector:@selector(scale)]) {
            s = [[UIScreen mainScreen] scale];
            if (s > 1)
                fileName = NSTR2(@"%@%@", fileName, @"@2x");            
        }

        NSString *fileLocation = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:fileName ofType:extension];

        NSData *imgData = [[NSData alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:fileLocation options:NSDataReadingMappedIfSafe error:nil];

        BaseUIimage *tmpImage = [[BaseUIimage alloc] initWithData:imgData];

        [imgData release];

        image = (UIImageCached*)[UIImageCached imageWithCGImage:tmpImage.CGImage 
                                                    scale:s 
                                              orientation:UIImageOrientationUp];        

        [tmpImage release];

        if (image) {
            [self.cache setObject:image forKey:imageName];
            //NSLog(@"-- CACHE: new cached image: #%d", self.cache.count);          
        } else {
            NSLog(@"-- CACHE: can't cache image: %@", fileLocation);
        }
    } else {
        //NSLog(@"-- CACHE: read cached image");
    }
    return image;
}

@end

Why release and dealloc are never called? Does it mean that UIImage instances I create are not being dealloced and that is the reason of growing of virtual memory?

share|improve this question
    
do you ever call cleanCache? Otherwise the cache seems to be retaining the images. –  Felz Apr 29 '12 at 10:06
    
Yes. In this method in AppDelegate: - (void)applicationDidReceiveMemoryWarning:(UIApplication *)application { NSLog(@"BTC_DashboardAppDelegate applicationDidReceiveMemoryWarning"); [UIImageCached cleanCache]; } –  Kostya Kim Apr 29 '12 at 12:33
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2 Answers

You've created the subclass wrong. In the code here:

@implementation BaseUIimage

+ (id)imageWithData:(NSData *)data {
    NSLog(@"UIImage imageWithData");
    return [UIImage imageWithData:data];
}

...

You're not getting an instance of BaseUIimage, you're getting a regular UIImage, which means your overridden release/dealloc etc aren't called since they're not part of the UIImage class.

You need to change that function to:

@implementation BaseUIimage

+ (id)imageWithData:(NSData *)data {
    NSLog(@"UIImage imageWithData");
    return [super imageWithData:data];
}

...

Which will return an instance of your BaseUIimage class. Now you'll be able to see your overridden methods get called.

share|improve this answer
2  
This will certainly result infinite recursion. Is`t is? –  Kostya Kim Apr 29 '12 at 8:26
    
Yeah, sorry, it's late. I've edited the answer, using super instead. –  Dave Wood Apr 29 '12 at 8:29
    
It still doesn't work. Anyway super here is UIImage. –  Kostya Kim Apr 29 '12 at 8:43
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Dave Wood was almost right (his implementation will still create a UIImage). The problem is that

[UIImage imageWithData:data];

will create a UIImage and not the subclass you expect it to create. To test this try the following implementation of imageWithData:

+ (id)imageWithData:(NSData *)data {
    NSLog(@"UIImage imageWithData");
    UIImage *im = [UIImage imageWithData:data];
    NSLog(@"%@",[im class]);
    return im;
}

The NSLog will output UIImage. Not what you need. I suggest the following implementation:

+ (id)imageWithData:(NSData *)data {
    NSLog(@"UIImage imageWithData");
    BaseUIimage *im = [[BaseUIimage alloc] initWithData:data];
    return [im autorelease];
}

This will create an image of the BaseUIimage class and thus behaving how you expect. Cheers.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, yep, that's what I meant. :) –  Dave Wood Apr 29 '12 at 14:39
    
thanks! but why the previous implementation is not working? it is working when I subclass UIViewController for example. –  Kostya Kim May 2 '12 at 5:17
2  
I don't get how you use the UIViewController subclass. However, [UIImage imageWithData:data] will create an object of class UIImage no matter where you call it. No way around it. When you call [UIImage imageWithData:data] you are saying "hey UIImage class create me a instance with this data." UIImage only knows UIImage not the subclasses. That "imageWithData:" is a class factory method. It is different when you do [[BaseUIimage alloc] initWithData:data] where you are calling a constructor that BaseUIimage inherits from UIImage. Now the question is, did my suggestion solved your problem? –  Felz May 2 '12 at 5:29
    
Your suggestion solved the problem. Thanks!!! –  Kostya Kim May 2 '12 at 12:41
    
Great! Please consider awarding me the answer. It is good for you too since it will improve your acceptance rate. A bad acceptance rate hurts the chances of people answering your questions. –  Felz May 3 '12 at 7:46
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