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I'm doing my homework with LINUX and I have some question about hash function. When I input *mnemonic_name into some character string like 'ADD', the find_index is random every time when I compile. Would you explain this problem and solve it for me?

Here is my code:

251  int symtab_finder(char *mnemonic_name)
252  {
253      node *temp;
254 
255      int find_index  =   op_find(mnemonic_name);
256      int find_flag   =   0;
257 
258      temp    =   optabl[find_index].head;
259 
260      while(temp)
261      {
262          if((strcmp(temp->mnemonic_name,mnemonic_name)==0))
263          {
264              find_flag   =   1;
265          }
266          temp    =   temp->next;
267 
268      }
269      if(find_flag == 0)
270      {
271 
272      }
273      printf("name %s, flag %d, find index %d\n",mnemonic_name,find_flag, find_index);
274      return find_flag;
275  }

When I put in string like 'ADD' into the '*mnemonic_name' variable, the output 'find_index' is random! I do not know why this happens.

Here's my op_find code below.

 44  int op_find(char *mnemonic_name)
 45  {
 46      int op_index;
 47      int i;
 48      for(i=0; i< strlen(mnemonic_name); i++)
 49      {
 50          op_index += mnemonic_name[i];
 51      }
 52 
 53  //  printf("op_index is %d\n",op_index % 20);
 54      return op_index = op_index % 20;
 55  }
 56 
 57  int mn_find(char *opcode_number)
 58  {
 59      int opcode_value;
 60      opcode_value = hex_to_dec(opcode_number);
 61  //  printf("mne value is %d\n",((opcode_value/4)%20));
 62      return ((opcode_value/4)%20);
 63  }
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7  
You should initialize your variables. As op_index is not initialized, it may get a random value. –  Francis Apr 29 '12 at 8:35
    
Wow!! Francis! thanks!! this is really hard to find this timid problem.. Thanks again!! –  Sogo Apr 29 '12 at 8:39
5  
Only that about every compiler warns about this situation, so always use -Wall –  hroptatyr Apr 29 '12 at 8:42
    
hello hroptayr! thanks your comment! but my LINUX machine cannot warn it to me even though I using '-Wall' opearation into a 'makefile'. Anyway, thank to your kindness and have a good day! –  Sogo Apr 29 '12 at 8:47
4  
Then you have something wrong somewhere (perhaps in your makefile). You really should always use -Wall, and you should avoid most warnings (the very few you don't well to avoid should have big comments in the code for explanation....) –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 29 '12 at 13:04

1 Answer 1

OK. So just for the sake of removing this from the 'unanswered' section I am re-adding the answer already given by Francis:

int op_index; // <-- not initialized.

And make sure to use -Wall in compiler flags.

(additionally added +1 to Francis comment.)

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