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I have a question about C and attempting to mock a partial type of "inheritance", only in accessing members of structures. Look at the following example:

#pragma pack(push,1)
typedef struct foo
{
    int value;
    int value2;
}foo;
typedef struct foo_extended
{
    // "inherits" foo
    int value;
    int value2;
    // "inherits" foo stops
    //we also have some additional data
    float additional;
}foo_extended;
#pragma pack(pop)


//! This function works for both foo types
void workboth(void* objP)
{
    foo* obj = (foo*)objP;

    obj->value = 5;
    obj->value2 = 15;
}

//! This works only for the extended
void workextended(foo_extended* obj)
{
    obj->value = 25;
    obj->value2 = 35;
    obj->additional = 3.14;
}

int main()
{
    foo a;
    foo_extended b;

    workboth(&a);
    workboth(&b);
    workextended(&b);

    return 0;
}

This works in my system but my question is whether this can be portable as long as there is correct packing of the involved structures (depending on the compiler). I suppose it would need #ifndefs correcttly invoking the tight packing in other compilers too.

Of course the obvious problem is total lack of type checking and putting all of the responsibility of correct usage to the programmer but I am wondering if this is portable or not. Thanks!

P.S.: Forgot to mention that the standard I attempt to adhere to is C99

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

By reading 6.7.2.1/12 and /13 in the C99 draft, I think it can be assumed that two different structs with the same initial members are compatible up to the first different member.

6.7.2.1/12

Each non-bit-field member of a structure or union object is aligned in an implementation-defined manner appropriate to its type.

6.7.2.1/13

Within a structure object, the non-bit-field members and the units in which bit-fields reside have addresses that increase in the order in which they are declared. A pointer to a structure object, suitably converted, points to its initial member (or if that member is a bit-field, then to the unit in which it resides), and vice versa. There may be unnamed padding within a structure object, but not at its beginning.

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Thank you. This answers my question since I want to be compatible with C99. Forgot to mention it in my question –  Lefteris Apr 29 '12 at 10:07
    
Hm, I don't see how you draw your conclusion from the text that you are citing. It only guarantees that their order is the same and that the alignment is appropriate for the type. It says nothing that the internal padding of foo might not change when following fields differ. –  Jens Gustedt Apr 29 '12 at 12:49
    
Yes, of course @JensGustedt. But an implement needs to be actively programmer unfriendly to have different implementation details for structs, say with 2 or 3 menbers ... –  pmg Apr 29 '12 at 13:28
    
@pmg, I agree on your social analysis :) On the other hand you could have alignment strategies that imply such a thing if the types of all the fields were all different. Say if you have type a and b where b may be aligned as sizeof(a) but is better aligned at 2*sizeof(a). If the compiler sees that the overall size of the foo_extended structure wouldn't change it could adjust alignment such b lands on a more suitable boundary. –  Jens Gustedt Apr 29 '12 at 13:35
    
@JensGustedt which is why I put the tight packing in the struct so that such a situation would not break the "inheritance". I guess that's why unnamed structs are the best solution, albeit a little ahead in the standard –  Lefteris Apr 29 '12 at 14:14

I have a slightly different method. Instead of using the same values, I create a struct in the struct, and this way the packing is unnecessary:

typedef struct foo
{
    int value;
    int value2;
}foo;

typedef struct foo_extended
{
    foo father;
    float additional;
}foo_extended;

now the rest is pretty much as you showed, with a small difference:

void workextended(foo_extended* obj)
{
    obj->father.value = 25;
    obj->father.value2 = 35;
    obj->additional = 3.14;
}

but I would add an id as a field of the first object in the hierarchy to make sure the casting is done to the correct object.

This method is guaranteed to work by the C standard.

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Thanks for the answer. I know of this method but the problem with it method is that you need to do obj->father.value as you showed. –  Lefteris Apr 29 '12 at 10:08

As of C11, and also supported by some existing compilers as extensions to older standards, you should use an anonymous struct for that

struct foo_extended {
    struct {
      int value;
      int value2;
    };
    //we also have some additional data
    float additional;
};

by this your substructure has exactly the same layout as foo in particular what concerns alignment of its parts: to be compatible between different compilation units struct that have exactly the same fields in the same order must be laid out identically.

(The impact of your packed pragma is not so clear to me)

Since your foo structure is the first in foo_extended it must always be at offset 0 within that one.

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This would be the best choice I suppose. The problem is that it is C11. So only for compatibility reasons I think that I should stick to my method. Correct me if my thinking here is wrong. The packed pragma is there since some times if I don't put it there the compiler packs these structures differently and I get wrong data at pointer dereferencing. –  Lefteris Apr 29 '12 at 10:13
    
I don't think that C11 is too much of a restriction here. gcc (+ relatives) and microsoft compilers support this. So you'd be largely covered :) –  Jens Gustedt Apr 29 '12 at 12:53
    
Good that you mentioned it in a reply cause I was wondering about that. Oh well, it's a small change only in the definition of every struct that would need to be done so it's easily doable in the future too. Need to research on it a bit more. Would help get rid of the annoying packing pragmas –  Lefteris Apr 29 '12 at 13:03

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