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I have got below records in SQL Profiler if my proc is called.

CPU - 78, Reads - 3508, Writes - 0, Duration - 81

Is above data is ok for concurrent hits for 70 person on my website, My proc is called on evey page the user is visiting, the performance monitor on my server shows anonmyous user hit keep increasing when I enable my SQL proc calling.

Please suggest what and where I can look!!, my proc query is given below:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[GETDataFromLinkInfo] 
-- Add the parameters for the stored procedure here 
(@PageID INT) 
AS 
  BEGIN 
      -- SET NOCOUNT ON added to prevent extra result sets from 
      -- interfering with SELECT statements. 
      SET NOCOUNT ON; 

      -- Insert statements for procedure here 
      SELECT DISTINCT [PUBLICATION_ID] AS n, 
                      [URL]            AS u 
      FROM   [LINK_INFO] WITH(NOLOCK) 
      WHERE  Page_ID = @PageID 
             AND Component_Template_Priority > 0 
             AND PUBLICATION_ID NOT IN( 232, 481 ) 
      ORDER  BY URL 
      FOR XML RAW ('p'), ROOT ('ps'); 

      RETURN 
  END 
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1  
What indexes on the table? What does the execution plan look like? –  Martin Smith Apr 29 '12 at 11:42
1  
Analyze your query with the database tuning advisor. See what indexes it suggests. –  Phil Apr 29 '12 at 11:57
    
Publication_Id is indexed, my usercontrol sits on master page from where my pageID is passed to my webservice proxy method and my webmethod calls above SQL procedure and the results returned back is just 25 KB to my control and the xml returned from my proc is further transformed using my xslt. –  Manoj Singh Apr 29 '12 at 12:21
1  
@M.S That information is largely irrelevant. Please provide the exact definition of the CREATE TABLE statement. The exact definition of all indexes on the table and the actual execution plan for the query. –  Martin Smith Apr 29 '12 at 12:28
    
as noted about the indexes, I would have an index on (Page_ID, URL, Publication_ID), but not familiar w/SQL-Server's "FOR XML", can't offer optimizing on that. –  DRapp Apr 29 '12 at 13:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Execute the proc 1000 times and measure how long it took. This is the most important metric to judge performance (time elapsed). Don't measure reads and writes.

Regarding my advice not to look at reads/writes: Reads, however, can either be cached or non-cached which is a huge difference. I always look at the execution plan to see why a query is behaving the way it is and what do to. The read/write metrics neither tell you if you need to act nor what do to.

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Thanks usr, is there any tool to run my proc 1000 times, please suggest how to check it –  Manoj Singh Apr 29 '12 at 11:37
    
Write a small C# program to do it. It's just a loop. –  usr Apr 29 '12 at 11:41
    
is my above query can be more optimized in terms of performance –  Manoj Singh Apr 29 '12 at 12:22
    
reads are absolutely a useful metric for query optimization. Measuring execution will show current performance, but not how to improve it. Also, if execution is measured in an environment that doesn't match production, the results can be inaccurate. The CPU time metric returned by SET STATISTICS TIME ON shows relative CPU resource consumption, and allows for more efficient analysis than running a statement 1000 times –  Jim McKeon Apr 29 '12 at 17:03
    
I'm saying nothing against CPU time. Reads, however, can either be cached or non-cached which is a huge difference. I always look at the execution plan to see why a query is behaving the way it is and what do to. The read/write metrics neither tell you if you need to act nor what do to. –  usr Apr 29 '12 at 17:09

As Phil suggests, analyzing the query with the Database Engine Tuning Advisor is probably your best bet. You'd have to provide quite a bit more info to get any precise answers here - people might suggest one or more indexes, but an index's efficacy depends on the selectivity of the columns in it. Adding an un-useful index could actually negatively impact performance in other ways.

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