Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to switch the current database with a SQL statement. I have tried the following, but all attempts failed:

  1. USE @DatabaseName
  2. EXEC sp_sqlexec @Sql -- where @Sql = 'USE [' + @DatabaseName + ']'

To add a little more detail.

EDIT: I would like to perform several things on two separate database, where both are configured with a variable. Something like this:

USE Database1
SELECT * FROM Table1

USE Database2
SELECT * FROM Table2
share|improve this question
1  
Following Preet's information, you're going to have to put all the queries for the USE/SELECT into a single sp_sqlexec call. The USE will not survive beyond the call. –  Joel Goodwin Jun 24 '09 at 9:52
1  
I know of this solution, but it is ugly and unreadable. Having a script generating the final SQL would also be an option. –  Drejc Jun 24 '09 at 10:39
    
Sorry I thought you were just looking for a solution within SQL itself. Within SQL, you've only got the sp_sqlexec approach; the other option is to construct the SQL sequence of USE/SELECT externally. You'll still need to construct the SQL by hand but, on the plus side, your chosen scripting/application environment will be easier on string manipulation and not look so ugly. –  Joel Goodwin Jun 24 '09 at 11:15

8 Answers 8

   exec sp_execsql @Sql

The DB change only lasts for the time to complete @sql

http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2007/07/02/sql-server-2005-comparison-sp_executesql-vs-executeexec/

share|improve this answer
    
As said in the question this does not work. For instance if I run a SELECT command afterwards like: SELECT * FROM Table, an Invalid object name error is thrown –  Drejc Jun 24 '09 at 9:13
1  
the select must be in the @SQL - as I said the use is only for the duration on the @sql –  Preet Sangha Jun 24 '09 at 9:21
1  
It is kind of a solution, but useless for my purpose. –  Drejc Jun 24 '09 at 11:06

I have the same problem, I overcame it with an ugly -- but useful -- set of GOTOs.

The reason I call the "script runner" before everything is that I want to hide the complexity and ugly approach from any developer that just wants to work with the actual script. At the same time, I can make sure that the script is run in the two (extensible to three and more) databases in the exact same way.

GOTO ScriptRunner

ScriptExecutes:

--------------------ACTUAL SCRIPT--------------------
-------- Will be executed in DB1 and in DB2 ---------
--TODO: Your script right here

------------------ACTUAL SCRIPT ENDS-----------------

GOTO ScriptReturns

ScriptRunner:
    USE DB1
    GOTO ScriptExecutes

ScriptReturns:
    IF (db_name() = 'DB1')
    BEGIN
        USE DB2
        GOTO ScriptExecutes
    END

With this approach you get to keep your variables and SQL Server does not freak out if you happen to go over a DECLARE statement twice.

share|improve this answer
    
I know I'm answering questions from 2009, but hopefully someone like me will find here something that they can use. –  Alpha Nov 8 '12 at 17:18
    
This solution is awesome as it ACTUALLY WORKS!!! I can just put all my schema names in a stored procedure with this and then call the appropriate USE statement if there's a match. Brilliant. (It even validates they're in an approved set of names) –  user645280 Jun 5 at 17:25

The problem with the former is that what you're doing is USE 'myDB' rather than USE myDB. you're passing a string; but USE is looking for an explicit reference.

The latter example works for me.

declare @sql varchar(20)
select @sql = 'USE myDb'
EXEC sp_sqlexec @Sql

-- also works
select @sql = 'USE [myDb]'
EXEC sp_sqlexec @Sql
share|improve this answer
1  
Preet is correct with the above. Although the USE will work for the @sql statement, it won't be a permanent change. Having a paramterised USE would also present all sorts of performance/compilation implications, and I can't see any alternative working. – goodgai 0 secs ago [delete this comment] –  Joel Goodwin Jun 24 '09 at 9:09

try this:

DECLARE @Query         varchar(1000)
DECLARE @DatabaseName  varchar(500)

SET @DatabaseName='xyz'
SET @Query='SELECT * FROM Server.'+@DatabaseName+'.Owner.Table1'
EXEC (@Query)

SET @DatabaseName='abc'
SET @Query='SELECT * FROM Server.'+@DatabaseName+'.Owner.Table2'
EXEC (@Query)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware of this solution, but it is usless for my purpose. –  Drejc Jun 24 '09 at 17:44

If SQLCMD is an option, it supports scripting variables above and beyond what straight T-SQL can do. For example: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188714.aspx

share|improve this answer

I case that someone need a solution for this, this is one:

if you use a dynamic USE statement all your query need to be dynamic, because it need to be everything in the same context.

You can try with SYNONYM, is basically an ALIAS to a specific Table, this SYNONYM is inserted into the sys.synonyms table so you have access to it from any context

Look this static statement:

CREATE SYNONYM MASTER_SCHEMACOLUMNS FOR Master.INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
SELECT * FROM MASTER_SCHEMACOLUMNS

Now dynamic:

DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(200)
DECLARE @CATALOG VARCHAR(200) = 'Master'

IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM  sys.synonyms s WHERE s.name = 'CURRENT_SCHEMACOLUMNS')
BEGIN
DROP SYNONYM CURRENT_SCHEMACOLUMNS
END

SELECT @SQL = 'CREATE SYNONYM CURRENT_SCHEMACOLUMNS FOR '+ @CATALOG +'.INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS';
EXEC sp_sqlexec @SQL

--Your not dynamic Code
SELECT * FROM CURRENT_SCHEMACOLUMNS

Now just change the value of @CATALOG and you will be able to list the same table but from different catalog.

share|improve this answer

Use exec sp_execsql @Sql

Example

DECLARE @sql as nvarchar(100)  
DECLARE @paraDOB datetime  
SET @paraDOB = '1/1/1981'  
SET @sql=N'SELECT * FROM EmpMast WHERE DOB >= @paraDOB'  
exec sp_executesql @sql,N'@paraDOB datetime',@paraDOB
share|improve this answer
    
? ... I don't get it. –  Drejc Jun 24 '09 at 10:37

-- If you are using a variable for the database name.
-- Try something like this.

DECLARE @DBName varchar(50)
Set @DBName = 'Database1'; /* <-- This could be passed in by a parameter. */

IF( @DBName = 'Database1')
Begin
    USE [Database1];
   SELECT * FROM Table1;
End

IF( @DBName = 'Database2')
Begin
   USE [Database2];
   SELECT * FROM Table2;
End

IF( @DBName is null)
Begin
   USE [Database1];
End

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.