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Is it possible to do an iterative in-order-traversal on a BST whose node has a parent pointer (the parent of the root is null) without using a visited flag or a stack?

I googled and didn't find a reply. The point is, how can I know - at a certain node - that I've just come to it vs I've finished everything underneath it?

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2  
Recursion? Though thats an indirect use of stacks. –  Shubham Apr 29 '12 at 11:47
    
This sounds like one of those silly interview questions. Recursion is most likely the expected answer. –  pablochan Apr 29 '12 at 11:49
3  
[@Shubham, @pablochan] If you read the question again, you'll find the word iterative written explicitly. –  OmarOthman Apr 29 '12 at 11:51
    
Well then the answer is no (unless you can save the visited nodes somewhere) –  pablochan Apr 29 '12 at 11:54
1  
@pablochan, are you sure? I think you can do that, see my answer. –  svick Apr 29 '12 at 14:48
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7 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can do that, you just need to remember the last visited node along with the current node. Doing this is not disallowed by the problem statement: both visited flag on each node and a stack are (worst case) O(n), remembering the last node is just O(1).

In C#, the algorithm could look like this:

static void Walk(Node node)
{
    Node lastNode = null;
    while (node != null)
    {
        if (lastNode == node.Parent)
        {
            if (node.Left != null)
            {
                lastNode = node;
                node = node.Left;
                continue;
            }
            else
                lastNode = null;
        }
        if (lastNode == node.Left)
        {
            Output(node);

            if (node.Right != null)
            {
                lastNode = node;
                node = node.Right;
                continue;
            }
            else
                lastNode = null;
        }
        if (lastNode == node.Right)
        {
            lastNode = node;
            node = node.Parent;
        }
    }
}
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This code is in an infinite loop. When it tries to visit a leaf, after it comes up from the left side, the last node will be null, and when it intends to traverse down the right side, it will go into the (last == node.left) branch, and do the same thing all over again. –  Wilhelm Feb 20 at 2:54
    
@Wilhelm No, it won't. Notice that the branch for the right side is in an if, not else if. So, After it comes up from the left side (in the lastNode == node.Left branch), it immediately looks at the right side (lastNode == node.Right) and only after that it loops over. –  svick Feb 20 at 12:36
    
So you need a parent pointer, is it impossible to do otherwise then? –  bneil Jul 4 at 18:25
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Here is another way to do it. I think it is essentially equivalent to svick's answer, but avoids the extra variable. This version is implemented in Python:

node=root
if node is not None:
  while node.left is not None:
    node=node.left
  while node is not None:
    output(node)
    if node.right is not None:
      node=node.right
      while node.left is not None:
        node=node.left
    else:
      while node.parent is not None and node.parent.right is node:
        node=node.parent
      node=node.parent

Whatever node you visited last determines the next node that you need to visit. If you've just visited node X, then you need to visit the left-most node to the right of X. If X has no right child, then the next node is the first ancestor where node X didn't come from the right side.

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The code that Vaughn Cato provided does indeed traverse the tree in order, but so far as I can tell, it runs in an infinite loop once it reaches the end of the tree. Does anyone know of a way to fix this? –  user1481164 Jun 25 '12 at 21:47
    
@Nathan: I don't see the infinite loop you are talking about. When it traverses to the right-most node, then the last loop should send it back to the root and finally set node to the parent of the root, which should be None. The outer while loop would then terminate. –  Vaughn Cato Jun 26 '12 at 3:18
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Using svick's correct idea (see his answer), this is the tested code in C++. Note that I didn't test his code or even take a look at it, I just took his idea and implemented my own function.

void in_order_traversal_iterative_with_parent(node* root) {
node* current = root;
node* previous = NULL;

while (current) {
    if (previous == current->parent) { // Traversing down the tree.
        previous = current;
        if (current->left) {
            current = current->left;
        } else {
            cout << ' ' << current->data;
            if (current->right)
                current = current->right;
            else
                current = current->parent;
        }
    } else if (previous == current->left) { // Traversing up the tree from the left.
        previous = current;
        cout << ' ' << current->data;
        if (current->right)
            current = current->right;
        else
            current = current->parent;
    } else if (previous == current->right) { // Traversing up the tree from the right.
        previous = current;
        current = current->parent;
    }
}

cout << endl;
}
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public void inorderNoStack() {
    if (root == null) {
        return;
    }

    // use the previous to always track the last visited node
    // helps in deciding if we are going down/up
    Node prev = null;

    Node curr = root;

    while (curr != null) {
        // going down
        if (prev == null || prev.left == curr || prev.right == curr) {
            if (curr.left != null) {
                prev = curr;
                curr = curr.left;
                continue;
            } else {

                visitn(curr);

                if (curr.right != null) {
                    prev = curr;
                    curr = curr.right;
                    continue;
                } else {
                    // swap states
                    prev = curr;
                    curr = prev.parent;
                }
            }
        }

        // going up after left traversal
        if (curr != null && prev == curr.left) {

            visitn(curr);

            if (curr.right != null) {
                prev = curr;
                curr = curr.right;
                continue;
            } else {
                // swap states
                prev = curr;
                curr = prev.parent;
            }
        }

        // going up after right traversal
        if (curr != null && prev == curr.right) {
            // swap states
            prev = curr;
            curr = prev.parent;
        }
    }
}
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Answers containing just code with no explanation are not very useful. –  svick Jan 1 at 16:00
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The key is the parent pointers (or the ability to mutate the tree), but you need a constant amount of extra state (e.g., the program counter of the following coroutine).

  1. Set v to the root.
  2. While v has a left child, set v to its left child.
  3. Yield v.
  4. If v is the root, then return.
  5. Set p to v's parent.
  6. If p's right child is v, then set v to p and go to step 4.
  7. Yield p.
  8. If p has a right child, then set v to p's right child and go to step 2.
  9. Set v to p and go to step 4.
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Your code fails too many test cases. I've translated it to the exact spaghetti code in C++ and ran it against my test suite. –  OmarOthman Apr 30 '12 at 8:34
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Java solution..

public void traverse(Node root) {
    if(root == null) return;
    Node n = root;
    do{
        // traverse down
        if(n.left != null) {
            n = n.left;
            continue;
        }

        visit(n);

        if(n.right != null) {
            n = n.right;
            continue;
        }

        // traverse up
        while(n.parent != null) {
            if(n.parent.right == n) // right node?
                n = n.parent;
            else if (n.parent.left == n && n.parent.right == null) { 
                n  = n.parent;
                visit(n);
            } else {
                visit(n.parent);
                n = n.parent.right;
                break;
            }
        }

    } while(n.parent != null);
}
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This code wouldn't even compile. Where's the method visit? If it's keeping track of the nodes visited, that's exactly not what the OP asked for. –  Abhijit Sarkar Mar 7 at 20:53
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This is in C++:

void InOrder(Node *r)
{
   if(r==NULL)
         return;

   Node *t=r;

   while(t!=NULL)
       t=t->left;

  while(t!=r)
  {
     if(t==(t->parent->left))
     {
        cout<<t->parent->data;
        t=t->parent->right;
       if(t!=NULL)
      {
       while(t!=NULL)
          t=t->left;
      } 
      if(t==NULL)
          t=t->parent;
     }
     if(t==t->parent->right)
     {
        t=t->parent;
     }
  }
}
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