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I am implementing the enum class which I will use to retrieve some background in application, a current implementation of this class is here:

public enum Painters{

    /**
     * Available painters.
     */
    Background(getBackgroundPainter()),
    InactiveBackground(getInactiveBackgroundPainter()),
    DesktopBackground(getBackgroundPainter());

    /**
     * The background painter.
     */
    private Painter<Component> _painter;

    /**
     * Constructor will initialize the object.
     */
    Painters(Painter<Component> painter){
        _painter = painter;
    }

    /**
     * Will return a current painter.
     * @return instance of Painter<Component>
     */
    public Painter<Component> painter(){
        return _painter;
    }

    private static Painter<Component> getBackgroundPainter(){
        MattePainter mp = new MattePainter(Colors.White.alpha(1f));
        PinstripePainter pp = new PinstripePainter(Colors.Gray.alpha(0.2f),45d);
       return (new CompoundPainter<Component>(mp, pp)); 
    }

    private static Painter<Component> getInactiveBackgroundPainter(){
        MattePainter mp = new MattePainter(Colors.White.alpha(1f));
        GlossPainter gp = new GlossPainter(Colors.Gray.alpha(0.1f), GlossPainter.GlossPosition.BOTTOM);
        PinstripePainter pp = new PinstripePainter(Colors.Gray.alpha(0.2f), 45d);
        return (new CompoundPainter<Component>(mp, pp, gp));    
    }
}

My problem is that I need to call the painter() method each time I trying to get a painter but I prefer just to write the type of the painter instead. I thought that if I can to extend the Painter by my enum then probably I will get the right functionality, but it looks that it is not possible in java.

public enum Painters extends Painter<Component>

Do you know any solution for this problem???

Currently I am using it in this way:

Painters.Background.painter();

but I need:

Painters.Background;
share|improve this question
    
I think you selected the wrong answer as "correct". –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 29 '12 at 12:15
    
Actually my painter is already an interface I confused with it because it was without I in the beginning ( Painter in my case is swingx's painter ). I believe that the answer is right in any case because the enum class allows to implement the interface and this is the only way to implement what do I need. –  AlexTheo Apr 29 '12 at 12:21
    
I did it with a factory before but I decided that enum class would be more elegant solution. –  AlexTheo Apr 29 '12 at 12:22
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels - how is an answer that avoids the question more correct than one that proposes a working solution? –  Perception Apr 29 '12 at 12:32
    
I'm sure you've seen situations where the question asks for a kludge to fix a design problem where the true solution is to fix the design issue. Factory seems a more natural fit here (at least to me). –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 29 '12 at 12:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could always define your painter as an interface and have your enum implement it. You won't be able to use generic wildcards, but as long as thats not a constraint you will be able to reference the painter in code the way you are wanting too:

interface Painter<T> {
    // ...
}

public enum Painters implements Painter<Component> {
    Background(getBackgroundPainter()),
    InactiveBackground(getInactiveBackgroundPainter()),
    DesktopBackground(getBackgroundPainter());

    private Painter<Component> _painter;

    // ...
}

Painter somePainter = Painters.Background;

Your enum would effectively be proxying over actual painter implementations.

share|improve this answer

Typically Enums are reserved for immutable constants where you need the the syntactic sugar of the switch/case and constructors. A factory pattern is more appropriate here:

public class PainterFactory {
    public static Painter<Component> getBackgroundPainter(){
    ...
    }

    public static Painter<Component> getInactiveBackgroundPainter(){
    ...
    }
}
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