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As an example I am trying to alter the GetResponse() function of HttpWebRequest

class HttpWebRequest_Override : HttpWebRequest
{
    public HttpWebRequest_Override(System.Runtime.Serialization.SerializationInfo SerializationInfo, System.Runtime.Serialization.StreamingContext StreamingContext) 
        : base(SerializationInfo, StreamingContext) { }

    public override WebResponse GetResponse()
    {
        //Edit GetResponse() code here.
    }
}

However I can't find the standard code for GetResponse() anywhere. Am I expected to write one from scratch? I'd like to Copy+Paste the original code in and then alter it. I already tried looking here but that didn't help much.

To test if I was even on the right track, I commented out GetResponse() and tried to use the HttpWebRequest_Override as-is (with only the constructor in).

And then using it like:

public static string DownloadText(string url)
{
    try
    {
        var request = (HttpWebRequest_Override)WebRequest.Create(url);
        request.Proxy = null;
        var response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();

        using (var reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
        {
            return reader.ReadToEnd();
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex) { return "error_program : "+ex.Message; }
}

But this throws the error:

Unable to cast object of type 'System.Net.HttpWebRequest' to type 'bulktest.HttpWebRequest_Override'.

So two questions:

Why isn't the class working, and where can I find the code for .NET classes so I can alter them?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

WebRequest.Create doesn't create an instance of your class, it creates an instance of HttpWebRequest, which you derive from. While you can cast an instance of a child as it's parent, you can't cast an instance of the parent as the child. The parent isn't guaranteed to have all of the methods of the child, whereas the child is guaranteed to have to the methods of the parent.

You can register custom protocols that are handled by your own, derived class or, via configuration, register your class to handle the default protocols. Whether you need to do this is an open question. From your example, a simple wrapper might be sufficient. The wrapper would take a HttpWebRequest instance in the constructor and delegate the standard WebRequest methods to that instance. Any new methods would use the underlying instance's methods for their work and layer your additional functionality on top of it.

EX:

 var request = new WebRequestWrapper((HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url));
 var html = request.DownloadText();

Where your class might look like:

 public class WebRequestWrapper
 {
      private HttpWebRequest _request;

      public WebRequestWrapper(HttpWebRequest request)
      {
          this._request = request;
      }

      public string DownloadText()
      {
          using (var response = (HttpWebResponse)this._request.GetResponse())
          using (var reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
          {
              return reader.ReadToEnd();
          }
      }
 }

FWIW, I don't like catching the exception and returning a string. I'd rather let the exception bubble up since the method returns a string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info, but how would this wrapper allow me to edit the code inside of GetResponse()? Since that's what I was going for. –  natli Apr 29 '12 at 13:58
    
What do you need to change the code for? The point of the wrapper is that you use the existing implementation and build on top of it. –  tvanfosson Apr 29 '12 at 14:12
    
Well, in the wrapper, we are still using HttpWebRequest.GetResponse() to get the response. Now, have a look at the class here. What if I wanted to, as an example, count how long certain steps take within that code. I wouldn't be able to do that unless I alter the code directly. –  natli Apr 29 '12 at 14:27

Custom web request types can be 'injected' via the .config file.

Have a look here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bc0fhzk5.aspx

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I've been searching for the past half hour how to actually use this so I can alter the code inside of GetResponse() but I can't for the life of me figure it out.. could you add a little bit more info? –  natli Apr 29 '12 at 14:00

You can browse .NET Framework source in different ways, for example, via .NET Reflector. But you can also see it online - for example, here's the source of HttpWebRequest.GetResponse():

http://typedescriptor.net/browse/members/326374-System.Net.HttpWebRequest.GetResponse()

As noted by others, you don't have to copy-paste the original code. But it's still good to know how it works.

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