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I have two methods read() and write() as below in a class.

class Store
{

  public void write()
  {
    // write to store;
  }

  public string  read()
  {
    // read from store;
  }
}

1) The Store object is a singleton.

2) I have a Writer class which will write to the store and several Reader classes which will read from the store at the same time.

My requirement is that when the writer is writing to the store, all the readers should wait. i.e., when control is in write(), all the calls to read() should be blocked. How do I achieve this? I have tried synchronize(Store.class) in the write() method, but doesn't seem like work for me.

share|improve this question
    
you don't want to synchronize on the class object (synchronized (foo.class)) but instead on the instance you are operating on. – andersoj May 1 '12 at 2:13
up vote 18 down vote accepted

The best option in this case is to use a reader-writer lock: ReadWriteLock. It allows a single writer, but multiple concurrent readers, so it's the most efficient mechanism for this type of scenario.

Some sample code:

class Store
{
    private ReadWriteLock rwlock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();

    public void write()
    {
       rwlock.writeLock().lock();
       try {
          write to store;
       } finally {
          rwlock.writeLock().unlock();
       }
    }

    public String read()
    {
       rwlock.readLock().lock();
       try {
          read from store;
       } finally {
          rwlock.readLock().unlock();
       }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
ReadWriteLock is an interface. ;) – Peter Lawrey Apr 29 '12 at 14:02
    
@Peter Lawrey: Sorry about that. Fixed. :) – Tudor Apr 29 '12 at 14:03
4  
@Tudor you should always wrap your read to store and write to store operations in a try block and make sure to have your unlock() methods in a corresponding finally block to prevent that the locks remain locked if an exception occurs. – matsev Apr 29 '12 at 14:07
1  
@matsev: Yep, that's a good practice. I'll add it. – Tudor Apr 29 '12 at 14:08
    
@Tudor Thanks :) I will implement this way... – vijvij123 Apr 29 '12 at 14:18

synchronized is the simplest solution so you should explain what you mean by "doesn't seem like work for me" and perhaps show us how you used it.

The better solution is to use ReentrantReadWriteLock because it allows concurrent access to readers as well.

share|improve this answer

When a method is synchronized on some object, a thread executing this method blocks all the other threads that try to enter another block/method that is synchronized on the same object.

So, if you want the writer threads to forbid any reader thread to read, you must synchronize both the write and the read method. There is no reason to synchronize on the Store class. Synchronizing on the Store object is more natural:

public synchronized void write() {
  write to store;
}

public synchronized String read() {
  read from store;
}

This, however, (maybe) has a drawback: it also forbids two reader threads to read at the same time. If you really need this to happen, you should use a ReadWriteLock. But this will lead to code that is less performant, and harder to understand and maintain. I would only use it if I have measured that this is needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you say that ReadWriteLock is less performant than synchronized? There's no good technical reason for that to be so since both methods should just be a higher-level interface to direct semaphore manipulation. – meustrus May 23 '14 at 18:56
    
In fact it looks like ReentrantReadWriteLock may actually perform better than synchronized, as long as you don't use "fair" locks. That seems to be one conclusion of this IBM comparison between synchronized and ReentrantLock. Although it's worth nothing that ReentrantLock is not the same as ReentrantReadWriteLock, why would you lock readers out if you don't have to? – meustrus May 23 '14 at 19:08
    
The problem with this approach is that readers cannot read out the datastructure concurrently, while in many cases, this is not a problem at all... – Willem Van Onsem Sep 2 '14 at 14:55

Use a ReadWriteLock from java.util.concurrent package

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