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I was a bit surprised finding out this feature in C++, and I didn't expect it to happen.

Here is the code:

struct XY {
    int x,y;
    XY(int v) : x(v), y(v) {}
};

bool test1(const XY &pos){
    return pos.x < pos.y;
}
bool test1(int x, int y){
    return x < y;
}
void functest(){
    int val = 5;
    test1(val);
}

So I can call a function with integer parameter, whether or not such overload exists, it will use the XY type function because it has a constructor of that same type! I don't want that to happen, what can I do to prevent this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Make the XY constructor explicit:

explicit XY(int v) : x(v), y(v) {}

This will disallow implicit conversions from int to XY, which is what is happening when you call the single-parameter test1 function.

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I don't understand why this is bad for you. There's literally no other match in your code. You called a function with one parameter, and you got the best match for it.

If you had this, then it'd be different:

bool test1(const XY &pos){
    return pos.x < pos.y;
}

bool test1(int x){
    return !x;
}

void functest(){
    int val = 5;
    test1(val);
}

If that were to run the first, then it'd be bad, as C++ doesn't "favor" using an implicit constructor. It favors "type first, then any object that has that type in constructor."

But what you have is 1 argument versus two arguments. I don't know why this is a problem here.

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1  
I had 3 functions originally: XY, int+int, and int. for the int i had combined x/y values into one integer for array access. now i realised that this method was very dangerous in some situations, so i decided to get rid of it: easiest way to change the code was to remove the int function, but surprisingly i noticed that it still compiled fine, resulting me unable to find the places to fix. However, i still think the type shouldnt be converted like that from another type constructor... just seems weird to me. –  Rookie Apr 29 '12 at 14:36
1  
-1: The makers of C++ added explicit for very good reasons. Just because a constructor takes certain parameters does not mean that you always intend it to allow conversion. Sometimes, you really do want an error, you don't want the compiler to find a way to just make it work. Because "working" is the wrong thing. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 29 '12 at 17:24
    
Fine, I understand that. and that's no reason to go around putting out -1's for people. It's just that in the example given, when I responded to it, it was a non-factor due to one argument versus two, and not anything to do with needing the explicit keyword. –  Kevin Anderson Apr 29 '12 at 22:41

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