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I am trying to use a previously created database following the tutorial:

http://www.reigndesign.com/blog/using-your-own-sqlite-database-in-android-applications/

I plan to use the database for storing questions for a trivia-like game. With the basic design of one table:

CREATE TABLE QUESTIONS (
 answer TEXT,             --text for answer
 create_by_user NUMERIC,  --boolean flag, true if question created by user
 _id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, --required by Android
 l10n TEXT,               --ISO 3-letter code for localization
 question TEXT            --text for question
);

And using the field l10n for l10n/i18n purposes, but I am not sure about how Android uses android_metadata table. In the tutorial a row with "en_US" value is inserted,

  1. Is this table a sort of built-in l10n used by Android?
  2. It would be advisable to use the table android_metadata for l10n instead of my own l10n field?
  3. What if I want the database to store different languages data and to give the option to the user to retrieve questions from different languages?
  4. Do I need or is it better to have one database per language?
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Android updates that field each time you open the database to the current default locale. That should be the system language unless you change the default in your app.

SQLiteDatabase#openDatabase

db.setLocale(Locale.getDefault());

It should be save to use that field but I have never tested it.

The purpose of that table is AFAIK to allow you to use COLLATE LOCALIZED in your statements - or not if you specify NO_LOCALIZED_COLLATORS

If you want to have a database of texts in different languages then consider using your own table of languages maybe as foreign key to you text table.

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Thanks zapl, that's very explainatory. –  viridis May 4 '12 at 8:33

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