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I am trying to understand how to use Bitwise AND to extract the values of individual bytes.

What I have is a 4-byte array and am casting the last 2 bytes into a single 2 byte value. Then I am trying to extract the original single byte values from that 2 byte value. See the attachment for a screen shot of my code and values.

The problem I am having is I am not able to get the value of the last byte in the 2 byte value.

How would I go about doing this with Bitwise AND?

Bitewise AND

Thanks for your help,

Richard Hughes

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Actually with the code you posted, x & 0x00FF as shown in the debugger does yield the correct result, so I'm not sure what you think the expected result is supposed to be? –  Timo Geusch Apr 29 '12 at 15:16
    
To be honest, I was expecting the result of 4, as ((char*)&x)[1] is 4 –  rhughes Apr 29 '12 at 15:19
    
See David Rodriguez's answer. –  Timo Geusch Apr 29 '12 at 15:22
    
possible duplicate of signed short to byte in c++ –  Bo Persson Apr 29 '12 at 15:47
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem I am having is I am not able to get the value of the last byte in the 2 byte value.

Your 2byte integer is formed with the values 3 and 4 (since your pointer is to a[1]). As you have already seen in your tests, you can get the 3 by applying the mask 0xFF. Now, to get the 4 you need to remove the lower bits and shift the value. In your example, by using the mask 0xFF00 you effectively remove the 3 from the 16bit number, but you leave the 4 in the high byte of your 2byte number, which is the value 1024 == 2^10 -- 11th bit set, which is the third bit in the second byte (counting from the least representative)

You can shift that result 8 bits to the right to get your 4, or else you can ignore the mask altogether, since by just shifting to the right the lowest bits will disappear:

4 == ( x>>8 )

More interesting results to test bitwise and can be obtained by working with a single number:

int x = 7;              // or char, for what matters:
(x & 0x1) == 1;
(x & (0x1<<1) ) == 2;   // (x & 0x2)
(x & ~(0x2)) == 5;
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The values in the 16 bit variable should be 3 and 4 as the array is casted to a uint16_t before accessing the index –  rhughes Apr 29 '12 at 15:23
    
Interesting. So if I wanted the second nibble in a 2 byte value, I would do something like: (x >> 4) & 0xF00 –  rhughes Apr 29 '12 at 15:35
    
"you leave the 4 in the high byte of your 2byte number, which is the value 1024 == 2^10 -- 11th bit set, which is the second bit in the second byte" actually the third bit ;) –  goldilocks Apr 29 '12 at 15:35
    
@rhughes: Right, I missed that the cast was previous to the indirection. The math I did was wrong, trying to match the results to my expected results. I have corrected the answer (just substituting numbers) --This explains the odd behavior with the endianess –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 29 '12 at 16:49
    
@rhughes: I don't think that is right (x>>4) & 0xF00. Note that the expression leaves four bits set in the high byte. If you want the highest nibble you would do (x >> 12) & 0xF, for the lowest nibble in the highest byte (x >> 8) & 0xF and so on. In the original expression you would get the right 4 bits, but in the wrong position . –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 29 '12 at 16:54
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You need to add some bit-shifting to convert the masked value from the upper byte to the lower byte.

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Do you have an example? I assumed (wrongly I now know) that x & 0x00FF would be the lower byte as it has 2 0's. Does each numeral not represent a nibble? –  rhughes Apr 29 '12 at 15:21
    
@rhughes: The problem is with the 0xFF00 mask, not the 0x00FF. x & 0xFF00 yields 0x0400, not 0x0004. –  Ben Voigt Apr 29 '12 at 15:41
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The problem I am having is I am not able to get the value of the last byte in the 2 byte value.

Not sure where that "watch" table comes from or if there is more code involved, but it looks to me like the result is correct. Remember, one of them is a high byte and so the value is shifted << 8 places. On a little endian machine, the high byte would be the second one.

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I think I understand now. x & 0x00FF does not remove the 1st byte, it simple sets it to 0. So the resulting value is 0000 0000 <respective binary> –  rhughes Apr 29 '12 at 15:25
    
Yeah, that's how AND works. If a bit is not set in both values, the result is zero. So 0x00FF "masks out" the high byte, since those bits could not be set in both values if they aren't in the mask. What you are left with is just the bits set in the low byte of the other value. –  goldilocks Apr 29 '12 at 15:27
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