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My assembler is YASM and I am coding on 64-bit Linux.

I assemble using yasm -f elf -m amd64 -g dwarf2 filename.asm and link using ld

I'm trying to implement selection sort. rdi and rsi are pointing to various parts of a strbuf2 resb 10 array. What could possibly be the reason for this segmentation fault? Lines 105 and 106 do the exact same type of operation, so why does it crash on line 106 but not line 105?

I've included the relevant portion of the code, and the gdbtui screenshot when it crashes.

UPDATE: Counters fixed

; ====== Sorting begins here ======
; Register uses:
; bpl holds the current minimum value
; r8 holds the memory address of the current minimum value
; rdi points to the boundary of the "outer loop"
; rsi points to the boundary of the "inner loop"
sorting:
    mov rdi, strbuf2  ; outer loop pointer
    mov rsi, strbuf2+1  ; inner loop pointer
    mov rax, 1  ; inner loop counter
    mov rbx, 0  ; outer loop counter

innerloop:
    mov bpl, [rdi] ; assume beginning element of unsorted array is minimum

    ; store the value of first element of unsorted array
    mov dl, [rdi]

    ; compare the current small value with the value in rsi
    mov cl, [rsi]   
    cmp bpl, cl 
    jg  new_small

    inc rsi
    inc rax
    cmp rax, 9
    jle innerloop
    jg  innerloop_done

new_small:
    inc rax
    mov bpl, cl; save the new small value
    mov r8, rsi  ; save its index 
    inc rsi 
    cmp rax, 9
    jle     innerloop

innerloop_done:
    ; When the inner loop is completed...
    ; First, do the swap
    ; to swap r8 (target memory address)  with [rdi] (outer array boundary)
    mov dl, 0 ; initialise
    mov dl, [rdi]
    mov [rdi], bpl
    mov [r8], dl 

    inc rdi  ; move the outer loop pointer forward
    inc rsi  ; move the inner loop pointer forward
    inc rbx  ; increment the outer loop counter (the unsorted array becomes smaller)

    ; set the inner loop counter to the appropriate position
    mov rax, 1 
    add rax, rbx  ; now rax (inner loop counter)
                  ; will always be rbx+1 (outer loop counter + 1) 
    cmp rbx, 9  
    jle innerloop
; ====== Sorting ends here ======

Segmentation fault gdb output

share|improve this question
    
What is this?: mov r9b, 0+mov [r9b], 0? It can't compile. And even if it did, why would you write 0 to memory at address 0??? –  Alexey Frunze Apr 30 '12 at 5:40
    
@Alex: Oops, that line doesn't exist in my current code... looks like I pasted an earlier revision of the code. I've updated the listing. Thanks for pointing that out. By the way, this might be a good time to bring up the fact that mov r9b, [rdi] results in a void value for r9b, according to gdb. I'm trying to figure out why :( –  Terribad Apr 30 '12 at 5:43
1  
How about writing the above code in as simple C as possible (without complex expressions), making it work in C and than changing variables to registers, </>= to cmp/jb/jge, etc? –  Alexey Frunze Apr 30 '12 at 5:48
    
@Alex: Thanks for the suggestion. I've been debugging this a lot in gdb and I feel like I'm close logic-wise. The problems I'm having seem to stem from my lack of understanding of this godforsaken low-level language, and I'm having to learn and unlearn at the same time. Actually I did write a C program first and this is what it turned into (lol). Maybe it would help if I had used C goto instead of loops? (eep!). –  Terribad Apr 30 '12 at 6:03
    
Another observation: mov [r8], r10 will write the entire r10 register (8 bytes) to the address saved in r8, you should be writing just one byte. –  DCoder Apr 30 '12 at 6:42
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you're getting lost in the details of the implementation and forgetting what the code should do. I suggest that you first implement the code in C and then gradually change it to become ASM-like until the point when you can write it in ASM fully.

Note the progression from the small, clean and easy to understand implementation in C in sortC1() to the somewhat messy but completely equivalent ASM-like implementation in sortAsm(). Use your favorite file comparison tool to see what changes between the implementations.

The code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char strOriginal[11] = "8163045297";
char str[11];

void sortC1(void)
{
  int outIdx, inIdx, minIdx;
  char min, tmp;

  for (outIdx = 0; outIdx < 10; outIdx++)
  {
    minIdx = outIdx;
    min = str[minIdx];

    for (inIdx = outIdx; inIdx < 10; inIdx++)
    {
      if (min > str[inIdx])
      {
        minIdx = inIdx;
        min = str[minIdx];
      }
    }

    tmp = str[outIdx];
    str[outIdx] = min;
    str[minIdx] = tmp;
  }
}

void sortC2(void)
{
  char *outPtr, *inPtr, *minPtr;
  int outCnt, inCnt;
  char min, tmp;

  for (outPtr = str, outCnt = 0;
       outCnt < 10;
       outPtr++, outCnt++)
  {
    minPtr = outPtr;
    min = *minPtr;

    for (inPtr = outPtr, inCnt = 10 - outCnt;
         inCnt > 0;
         inPtr++, inCnt--)
    {
      if (min > *inPtr)
      {
        minPtr = inPtr;
        min = *minPtr;
      }
    }

    tmp = *outPtr;
    *outPtr = min;
    *minPtr = tmp;
  }
}

void sortC3(void)
{
  char *outPtr, *inPtr, *minPtr;
  int outCnt, inCnt;
  char min, tmp;

  outPtr = str;
  outCnt = 0;

  while (outCnt < 10)
  {
    minPtr = outPtr;
    min = *minPtr;

    inPtr = outPtr;
    inCnt = 10 - outCnt;

    while (inCnt > 0)
    {
      if (min > *inPtr)
      {
        minPtr = inPtr;
        min = *minPtr;
      }

      inPtr++;
      inCnt--;
    }

    tmp = *outPtr;
    *outPtr = min;
    *minPtr = tmp;

    outPtr++;
    outCnt++;
  }
}

void sortC4(void)
{
  char *outPtr, *inPtr, *minPtr;
  int outCnt, inCnt;
  char min, tmp;

  outPtr = str;
  outCnt = 0;

outerloop:

  minPtr = outPtr;
  min = *minPtr;

  inPtr = outPtr;
  inCnt = 10 - outCnt;

innerloop:

  if (min > *inPtr)
  {
    minPtr = inPtr;
    min = *minPtr;
  }

  inPtr++;
  inCnt--;

  if (inCnt > 0)
    goto innerloop;

  tmp = *outPtr;
  *outPtr = min;
  *minPtr = tmp;

  outPtr++;
  outCnt++;
  if (outCnt < 10)
    goto outerloop;
}

void sortAsm(void)
{
  char* rdi; // points to the boundary of the "outer loop"
  char* rsi; // points to the boundary of the "inner loop"
  char* r8; // holds the current minimum value
  char r9b; // holds the current minimum value
  char r10b; // temporary storage for character exchange
  long long rbx; // outer loop counter
  long long rax; // inner loop counter

  rdi = str; // initialize outer loop pointer
  rbx = 0; // initialize outer loop counter

outerloop:

  r8 = rdi; // assume current element of partially sorted array is minimum,
  r9b = *r8; // save its index and value

  rsi = rdi; // initialize inner loop pointer
  rax = 10; // initialize inner loop counter
  rax -= rbx;

innerloop:

  // compare the current small value with the value in [rsi]
  if (r9b > *rsi)
  {
    r8 = rsi; // save the new small value's index
    r9b = *r8; // save the new small value
  }

  rsi++; // move the inner loop pointer forward
  rax--; // decrement the inner loop counter
  if (rax > 0)
    goto innerloop;

  // When the inner loop is completed...
  // First, do the swap
  // to swap [r8] (target memory address) with [rdi] (outer array boundary)
  r10b = *rdi;
  *rdi = r9b;
  *r8 = r10b;

  rdi++; // move the outer loop pointer forward
  rbx++; // increment the outer loop counter
  if (rbx < 10)
    goto outerloop;
}

int main(void)
{
  strcpy(str, strOriginal);
  printf("before sorting: %s\n", str);
  sortC1();
  printf("after sorting : %s\n\n", str);

  strcpy(str, strOriginal);
  printf("before sorting: %s\n", str);
  sortC2();
  printf("after sorting : %s\n\n", str);

  strcpy(str, strOriginal);
  printf("before sorting: %s\n", str);
  sortC3();
  printf("after sorting : %s\n\n", str);

  strcpy(str, strOriginal);
  printf("before sorting: %s\n", str);
  sortC4();
  printf("after sorting : %s\n\n", str);

  strcpy(str, strOriginal);
  printf("before sorting: %s\n", str);
  sortAsm();
  printf("after sorting : %s\n\n", str);

  return 0;
}

The output:

before sorting: 8163045297
after sorting : 0123456789

before sorting: 8163045297
after sorting : 0123456789

before sorting: 8163045297
after sorting : 0123456789

before sorting: 8163045297
after sorting : 0123456789

before sorting: 8163045297
after sorting : 0123456789
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this excellent example of how to simulate ASM code in C. When you put it that way, ASM suddenly seems a lot more accessible. I will definitely take this approach in my next program, which is supposed to be more difficult than the current one. Right now I feel like I'm this close to completing this program. According to gdb the search is working properly but the details are getting me. For example, thanks to DCoder I realized that I was writing 8 bytes on each swap instead of just one. –  Terribad Apr 30 '12 at 8:11
2  
I can give you another. Look at rax. You never reinitialize it once it's reached the maximum. Think of the algorithm. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 30 '12 at 8:44
    
Arrrrgh, now that's just /facepalm, can't believe I missed that. Thanks, again. And okay I do admit I lost focus of the algorithm at some point! :) I've updated the code listing. –  Terribad Apr 30 '12 at 9:28
2  
Now, isn't there the same problem with rsi? –  Alexey Frunze Apr 30 '12 at 9:49
    
I took the hint after your first tip and proceeded to look for similar problems. I noticed that rsi would always go one byte out of bounds when processing the last element, so I cheated by doing "If rsi > end of array, decrement it." I am happy to say that I now have a functional program, in no small part thanks to you and DCoder. Thank you very much for pointing me in the right directions! :) –  Terribad Apr 30 '12 at 12:39
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; store the value of first element in [small]
mov rdx, [rsi]
mov r9, rdx

; compare the current small value with the value in rsi
mov rcx, [rsi]  
cmp r9, rcx

You are comparing [rsi] to [rsi], they're going to be equal...

Also, r8 is only initialized inside the new_small block - if you never entered the block, then writing to [r8] is not a good idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out that I'm comparing [rsi] to [rsi]. Could you explain how I'm reading from [r8]? As far as I see, I'm only <em>writing</em> to [r8] and not reading from it. And I didn't know that registers had to be initialized before use. I thought we could just use them? –  Terribad Apr 29 '12 at 22:13
    
After replacing mov rdx, [rsi] with mov rdx, [rdi] as intended, the program no longer seg faults. It just loops infinitely now... –  Terribad Apr 29 '12 at 22:23
1  
@Terribad: You're right, your code is writing to [r8]. My mistake. But think about what you're doing - "I don't know what value r8 holds (because I never initialized it), but let's treat it as a pointer and write to that memory address!". I'll take a closer look at why it would be looping infinitely and get back to you. –  DCoder Apr 30 '12 at 4:51
    
I've updated the source code so that it no longer infinitely loops, but thanks for trying. I'm continuing to fix it. After the line mov r9b, [rdi] executes, I try to print r9b in gdb using p $r9b but gdb says its void. –  Terribad Apr 30 '12 at 5:27
    
I think I've come to understand that in assembly, to "initialize" a register means to "know that it contains valid, meaningful data before using it". After all that high-level programming my brain had been wired to simply think that initialization = setting to zero so that you don't get garbage. –  Terribad Apr 30 '12 at 6:11
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