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How to convert a column number (eg. 127) into an excel column (eg. AA)

Ok so I am writing a method which accepts a 2d array as a parameter. I want to put this 2d array onto an Excel worksheet but I need to work out the final cell location. I can get the height easily enough like so:

var height = data.GetLength(1); //`data` is the name of my 2d array

This gives me my Y axis but it's not so easy to get my X axis. Obviously I can get the number like so:

var width = data.GetLength(0);

This gives me a number, which I want to convert to a letter. So, for example, 0 is A, 1 is B and so on until we get to 26 which goes back to A again. I am sure that there is a simple way to do this but I have a total mental block.

What would you do?

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Mathias, chris neilsen, phoog, kiamlaluno, Matt May 4 '12 at 13:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I don't full understand your question. If you want the x-axis you could do data[0].GetLength(1). Or if your 2D array is of different sizes you could do data[i].GetLength(1) –  noMAD Apr 29 '12 at 16:00
    
I am trying to get the name of the Cell, so for example if I had a 4x4 array and I was starting at A1 the final cell name would be "D4". I can get the 4 easy enough with just data.GetLength(1) but data.GetLength(0) gives me a number, from which I want to work out the corresponding letter ("D"). –  JMK Apr 29 '12 at 16:02
3  
use the R1C1 reference style so you don't have to calculate the letter, or get the cell with topLeftCell.Offset(arrayHeight, arrayWidth) –  phoog Apr 29 '12 at 16:07
    
@Mathias And the selected answer of that question is more complete than any of the answers here. –  Sid Holland Apr 30 '12 at 6:04
    
@phoog Apologies, I didn't see this question, thanks for the heads up! –  JMK Apr 30 '12 at 13:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here's a version that also handles two-letter columns (after column Z):

static string GetColumnName(int index)
{
    const string letters = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

    var value = "";

    if (index >= letters.Length)
        value += letters[index / letters.Length - 1];

    value += letters[index % letters.Length];

    return value;
}
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That works perfectly, thankyou! –  JMK Apr 29 '12 at 16:35
    
Please explain the reasoning behind this in words. –  Edward Karak Dec 23 '13 at 21:52
1  
@EdwardKarak If you look at the A-Z range as a set of digits, an integer in base 10 n can be converted to a number written in A-Z notation (of at most two digits), where: the first digit is the result of the division of n to the number of digits (26) and the second digit will be the remainder of that division. –  w0lf Dec 26 '13 at 15:13

Just cast it to a char and do "ToString()".

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class MyClass
{
    public static void RunSnippet()
    {
        int myNumber = 65;
        string myLetter = ((char) myNumber).ToString();
        WL(myLetter);
    }

    #region Helper methods

    public static void Main()
    {
        try
        {
            RunSnippet();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            string error = string.Format("---\nThe following error occurred while executing the snippet:\n{0}\n---", e.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine(error);
        }
        finally
        {
            Console.Write("Press any key to continue...");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    private static void WL(object text, params object[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(text.ToString(), args);   
    }

    private static void RL()
    {
        Console.ReadLine(); 
    }

    private static void Break() 
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Break();
    }

    #endregion
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't even compile, let alone convert the column number properly. –  Sid Holland Apr 30 '12 at 6:08
    
GC Sid, here is a compilable version. –  bnieland Apr 30 '12 at 11:40
    
But it still doesn't fully answer the OP's question of how to convert column numbers into names. Once it gets to 27 your code will return [. The first answer here will do it well. –  Sid Holland Apr 30 '12 at 16:46

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