Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Possible Duplicate:
Java private field access

I just observed little weird(imho) thing in java :

class foo{
    private int secret;
    public int getSecret(){
        return secret;
    }
    public void confuseCoder(foo o){
        System.out.println(o.secret);
    }
}

Same question was there ( Java private field access ) but I'm not sure if I can live with that feeling that someday, somewhere I will access wrong variable and it will destroy world or something.

Is there any way to restrict access to private variables at the class level ?

Thanks, Vojtěch

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jigar Joshi, Jon Skeet, Brian Roach, Don Roby, bmargulies Apr 30 '12 at 1:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
^^ No really, that's the answer. You'll have to live with your feeling. – Brian Roach Apr 29 '12 at 17:00
1  
No, there's no way. – Thomas Uhrig Apr 29 '12 at 17:03
    
You have "restrict access to private variables at the class level" I suspect what you want is to restrict access to an instance. – Peter Lawrey Apr 29 '12 at 17:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

someday, somewhere I will access wrong variable and it will destroy world or something

That is called being human, since java has no way to avoid this error the compiler wont catch it for you. The right way to avoid world destroying errors is to write tests and use other forms of quality management.

While I think an experienced java programmer could write an Annotation Processor/compiler plugin to flag variables as instance private, there currently are no implementations I know of.

share|improve this answer

If you're concerned about mutating data you could always use final. It can even be public:

class Foo{
    public final int secret;
    public int getSecret(){
        return secret;
    }
    public Foo(int s){
       secret=s;
    }

   public static void main (String args[])
  { 
    foo Foo=new Foo(1);
    foo.secret=2;//Illegal 
   }
} 
share|improve this answer
2  
While I agree with what you're saying, the OP's question is talking about access rather than mutation. – Brian Roach Apr 29 '12 at 17:01

private keyword means that the variable cannot be accessed from anywhere but the class it belongs to (http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/accesscontrol.html). This means you easily restrict access to it by not providing a mutator method. You can also declare it as final to restrict any mutation.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.