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I'm developing an application for Android, and at one point the user chooses a region, after which the contents of all parts of the app is changed. Therefore I need to access an integer throughout the program. I have considered a singleton class, but I can't figure out how to add just an int, a get() and a set() to it (I want to be able to read everywhere and write in two classes(everywhere is fine)).

Should I simply declare it global?

This is what I've got going now, is it ok?

public enum Region {
INSTANCE;
private int rID =0;

public void setRID(int rID) {
    this.rID=rID;

}

public int getRID()
{
    return rID;
}

}

To be accessed with

Region.INSTANCE.setRID(5);
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3  
Code, please... –  Lion Apr 29 '12 at 17:13
2  
You have two choices: A) Singleton. You can find numerous examples here on SO and on the net. This is best accomplished in Java using an Enum. B) Dependency injection. This is preferred. You should simply be passing this information to your objects' constructors –  Brian Roach Apr 29 '12 at 17:21

4 Answers 4

Try something like

public class State
{
     static State instance = new State ();
     public static State getInstance() { return instance; }

     private int value;
     public void setValue (int value) { this.value = value; }
     public int getValue () { return value; }
}

Don't forget to store your value when your application exits, and restore it when it reloads.

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I suppose that's another question, but is there a possibility to run a method when the application is closed? –  Rickard Apr 29 '12 at 17:17

This is not really a Singleton, but a static class. A class that contains a static field (a field not bounded to an instance):

public class StaticClass {

    private static int value;

    private Singleton () {}

    public static int getValue () {
       return value;
    }
    public static void setValue (int val) {
       value = val;
    }

}

you can access the value by StaticClass.getValue() and set the value by StaticClass.getValue(4). ('StaticClass must not be replaced by an object).

The private constructor prevents one to create an instance by accident.

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It's a global variable. I don't see why this could not be a solution to the problem of the OP. –  CommuSoft Apr 29 '12 at 17:17
2  
Better, still not threadsafe. Singletons in java are best implemented using an Enum. –  Brian Roach Apr 29 '12 at 17:17
    
This isn't a singleton. Static variables are harder to change later if something about how they are managed needs to vary. See: oodesign.com/singleton-pattern.html –  Jules Apr 29 '12 at 17:18
    
Why not declare the class static? It's not like the user will make instances of a class like this. –  Shingetsu Apr 29 '12 at 17:18
3  
Without using volatile with your primitive you risk a thread having a cached copy and not seeing a change. –  Brian Roach Apr 29 '12 at 17:25

Create a public static class and declare the setter and getter as public.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I went with an enum:

public enum Region {
INSTANCE;
private int rID =0;

    public void setRID(int rID)
    {
        this.rID=rID;

    }

    public int getRID()
    {
        return rID;
    }
}

Which I access with

Region.INSTANCE.getRID();
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