Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have one class A, from which I need to access protected members of class B, in the same manner that one would use the friend keyword in C++. However, the internal modifier does not suit my needs. Class B will need to create an instance of class A, modify its private data, and return a reference to that class. Those class A members will need to remain private to the original caller.

public class A
{
    protected int x;
}

public class B
{
    public static A CreateClassA()
    {
        A x = new A();
        x.x = 5;   // ERROR : No privilege
        return x;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Tried redesigning your self out of that nightmare? –  Rune FS Apr 29 '12 at 19:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You will need to either create a public setter for the protected field or inherit from the class.

public class A
{
    protected int x;

    public int X { set { x = value; }  }
}

public static A CreateClassA()
{
    A x = new A();
    x.X = 5;
    return x;
}

Or:

public class B : A
{
    public static A CreateClassA()
    {
        this.x = 5; 
        return x;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it is a field, not a property: setter does not apply –  Marc Gravell Apr 29 '12 at 19:12
    
@MarcGravell - Yes, my mistake. But adding a public setter for the field should be OK, no? –  Oded Apr 29 '12 at 19:15
    
I can get behind that, sure! –  Marc Gravell Apr 29 '12 at 19:19
    
@MarcGravell - Just didn't get your "setter does not apply"... –  Oded Apr 29 '12 at 19:20
    
This will work, but you turned the field into a public field for all practical purposes. –  zmbq Apr 29 '12 at 20:26

You can only access protected members, if you inherit from A. You can now either:

  • Inherit from A
  • Make a public method setX(int newX) which sets the value of X.
share|improve this answer
    
That is what I was thinking, but having a public Set() method that the caller could utilize could upset the functionality of class A, since it is essentially read only data. Inheritance would not make any sense from the perspective I am using it, and I hope that's not the only option. –  user1364556 Apr 29 '12 at 19:13
    
If you want that field to behave immutable, add a constructor to class A which receives it as argument. –  Chopin Apr 29 '12 at 19:14
    
That's a nice one. In this way, x can only be set once from outside the Class A family. Note that classes that inherit from A are still able to change the value after an instance of A has been made. –  M.Schenkel Apr 29 '12 at 19:17

Try this:

   public class A
   {
      protected int x;

      public class B
      {
          public static A CreateClassA()
          {
              A x = new A();
              x.x = 5;   // ERROR : No privilege
              return x;
          }
      }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Will a class B exist for every class A that is created? –  user1364556 Apr 29 '12 at 19:16
    
No as long as it is static. Correct me if I am wrong. I use this kind of classes for building complex objects. Something like. SomeObject.Builder().DoSomething(). Where SomeObject = A, Builder = B, DoSomething = CreateClassA –  mynkow Apr 29 '12 at 19:18
    
What if you just leave the 'public class B' part? So class A contains a 'public static A CreateClassA()' (not really a good name, it creates an instance of Class A, not ClassA itself). I guess that would do the trick too –  M.Schenkel Apr 29 '12 at 19:26
    
It depends on how complex is the object. If it is only one field then static factory method is OK. But when you have variations of several components then a class is far better choice. –  mynkow Apr 29 '12 at 19:28

Other alternative:

public class A
{
    public A() { }

    public A(int x)
    {
        this.x = x;
    }

    protected int x;
}

public class B
{
    public static A CreateClassA()
    {
        A x = new A(5);
        return x;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You should check official MSDN Friend Assembly. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0tke9fxk.aspx By that example you could do:

using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;
using System;

[assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("AssemblyB")]
public sealed class A
{
    internal int x;
}

And from assembly B set/call internal methods/fields.

share|improve this answer

The question is a bit old at this point but here's another method, doing what you ask, without lectures or finger-wagging:

Consider:

A foo = new A();
FieldInfo privateField = foo.GetType().GetField("x", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
privateField.SetValue(foo, 5);

Warning: Use of the above code breaks encapsulation, curves your spine and may cause ear damage from the shrill screaming of OO purists.

...but it works great for factory classes, compensating for C#'s lack of a friend keyword.

Warning 2: This is slow.

share|improve this answer

You can use protected internal instead of internal to give access to all classes in the same assembly, as well as subclasses in other assemblies:

public class A
{
    protected internal int x;
}

public class B
{
    public static A CreateClassA()
    {
        A x = new A();
        x.x = 5;   // hurray
        return x;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.