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in the following code

#include<iostream>
#include<cstring>
using namespace std;
class data
{
public:
    long ddata;
    data(long dd)
    {
        ddata=dd;
    }
    void display()
    {
        cout<<ddata<<"  ";
    }
    };
class Node
{
     const  int order=4;
    int numitems;
    Node *parent;
    Node *childarray[order];
    data *item[order-1];
public:
    void connect(int childnum,Node *child)
    {
        childarray[childnum]=child;
        if(child!=NULL)
            child->parent=this;

    }
    //disconetc from this node,return it;

    Node *disconnectchild(int childnum)
    {
        Node *tempnode=childarray[childnum];
        childarray[childnum]=NULL;

     return  (tempnode);
    }
    Node *getchild(int childnum){
        return childarray[childnum];
}
    Node *getparent()
    {

        return parent;
    }
    bool isleaf()
    {
        return (childarray[0]==NULL)?true:false;

    }
    int getnumitems()
    {
        return numitems;
    }
    data *getitem(int index)
    {
        return item[index];
        }
        bool isfull()
    {

        return (numitems==order-1)?true:false;
    }
    int finditem(long key)
    {
        for(int j=0;j<order-1;j++)
        {
            if(item[j]==NULL)
                break;
            else if(item[j]->ddata==key)
                 return j;
            }
    return -1;
        }
    int insertitem(data *newitem)
    {
        numitems++;
        long newkey=newitem->ddata;
        for(int j=order-2;j>=0;j--)
        {
            if(item[j]==NULL)
                continue;
            else
            {
                long itskey=item[j]->ddata;
                if(newkey<itskey)
                    item[j+1]=item[j];
                else
                {
                    item[j+1]=newitem;
                    return j+1;

                }
                            }

        }
        item[0]=newitem;
        return 0;


    }
    data *removeitem()
    {
        data *temp=item[numitems-1];
        item[numitems-1]=NULL;
        numitems--;
        return temp;
        }
    void displayNode()
    {
        for(int j=0;j<numitems;j++)
            item[j]->display();
        cout<<endl;

    }

};

class tree234
{

private:
    Node *root=new Node();


};

it says that data member initializer is not allowed, Node root=new Node() it was example in java and i have added asterisk in front of root, but no success yet,please tell me how to correct it?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Brian Roach, hmjd, Bo Persson, Johnsyweb, bmargulies Apr 30 '12 at 1:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Please fix your indentation and whitespace, and please reduce this to a minimal test case. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 29 '12 at 20:36
2  
And please don't write code like return (a==b)?true:false;, return a==b is more than enough... –  zmbq Apr 29 '12 at 20:38
1  
Possible Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/8782440/… –  Cratylus Apr 29 '12 at 20:39
    
Node root = new Node() in java creates a reference in c++ the new returns a pointer to the object in your case a Node *. –  EdChum Apr 29 '12 at 20:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have essentially the same problem in a couple of places, but due to different circumstances, the fixes for them are different. On line 19 of your code you have:

class Node
{
    const  int order=4;    // line 19

Since this is apparently intended to apply to all instances of Node, you can make it work by making it a static member:

static const int order = 4;

For a static const variable, you can do in-place initialization like this, because the variable has static duration (lifetime), so this is almost like a definition of a global const, except that its name is only visible within Node's scope.

The other problem is similar:

class tree234
{
private:
    Node *root=new Node();

...but in this case, the fix is entirely different. Here you pretty clearly want root to be an instance variable -- i.e., each tree you create needs to have its own root node. As such, you need to define a normal member variable, (i.e., not static), and you need to initialize it in the constructor:

class tree234
    Node *root;
public:
    tree234() : root(new Node()) {}
};

I'd note, however, that this initialization looks...suspicious to me. My immediate guess is that an empty tree probably should not contain any node at all, so the initialization should probably be:

class tree234
    Node *root;
public:
    tree234() : root(NULL) {}
};

...and nodes will be added when/if/as you add data to the tree -- but an empty tree will remain exactly that: empty.

share|improve this answer
    
neither work,does it means that i have to donwvote this answers? –  dato datuashvili Apr 29 '12 at 21:30
1  
@dato: What do you mean by "neither work"? I've already checked, and the code (modified as I've pointed out) compiles with both VC++10 and g++ 4.7. If you're still having a problem, you probably need to be a bit more specific than "neither work", and point out the exact problem you're having. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 29 '12 at 21:34

You can't initialise member variables like that: initialise them in the constructor or constructor's initialiser list.

In C++03, only static const members of integral types can be initialized like this. I think in C++11 this has been extended, but I am unsure of the exact details.

share|improve this answer
    
In C++11 you can initialize non-static data members at the point of declaration. –  juanchopanza Apr 29 '12 at 21:07
    
@juanchopanza, are there any restrictions? –  hmjd Apr 29 '12 at 21:09
    
Not that I'm aware of. –  juanchopanza Apr 29 '12 at 21:13

In C++03 you cannot initialize the pointer like that at the point of declaration. You should initialize it in the constructors:

class tree234
{
public :
    tree234() : root(new Node()) {}
private:
    Node* root;
};

In C++11 is is OK to do that

class tree234
{
private:
    Node* root = new Node(); // or Node* root{new Node()}
};
share|improve this answer

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