Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using the Sorcery library in a rails app. One of its modules is for external authentication, and I need to add a method to that module.

The existing code is here, I want to add the add_provider_to_user method from this patch.

So, I added a file to my lib/modules directory, which I've told rails to autoload. The file is called sorcery_extension.rb and it looks like this:

module Sorcery
  module Controller
    module Submodules
      module External
        module InstanceMethods
          protected

          # If user is logged, he can add all available providers into his account
          def add_provider_to_user(provider)
            provider_name = provider.to_sym
            provider = Config.send(provider_name)
            user_hash = provider.get_user_hash
            config = user_class.sorcery_config

            user = current_user.send(config.authentications_class.to_s.downcase.pluralize).build(config.provider_uid_attribute_name => user_hash[:uid], config.provider_attribute_name => provider)
            user.save(:validate => false)

            return user
          end
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

This didn't work. I get undefined method error in my controller (where calling the other sorcery methods works fine).

So, my basic understanding of ruby is you can add methods to an object or module at any time... I think I've copied the nesting of the modules correctly in the file. Do I need to name the module file something different? I'm not really sure how to do this kind of thing, so any help is much appreciated. Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your file is never required. You can double check this by typing in the console:

Sorcery::Controller::Submodules::External::InstanceMethods.method_defined?(:add_provider_to_user)
  # => will return false, you want true

The reason is that auloading only happens when a constant is unknown in which case Rails will try to autoload it from the different autoloaded paths.

You have to require your file explicitly (e.g. from a file in initializer) and things will work as expected.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Rails convention on requires is that for every module it looks in a directory of the same name.

For your example

module Sorcery
  module Controller
    module Submodules
      module External
       module InstanceMethods

If you want to put the module in the lib directory. When it goes to "autorequire" Rails would be expecting it in this path

lib/sorcery/controller/submodules/external/instance_methods.rb

This is why its generally good convention to keep your module nesting shallow. ~ 2 levels deep.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.