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guys, I'm making simple graph drawer and want to find beautiful values for horizontal lines. For example, if I have value equals to 72089.601562, beautiful is 70000, or 75000. So, I think that beautifulNumber%5 = 0. Have you any ideas?

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you want to round to the nearest 5,000th? –  Trevor Hickey Apr 29 '12 at 21:21
1  
Methinks NSNumberFormatter would work. –  CodaFi Apr 29 '12 at 21:25
    
Rounding should be dynamic. For example 7 should transform to 10. –  itruf Apr 29 '12 at 21:31
    
What do you mean by 'dynamic'? –  Joe Apr 30 '12 at 8:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about this?

#import <math.h>
#import <stdio.h>

#define ROUNDING 5000

int beautify(float input)
{
    // Cast to int, losing the decimal value.
    int value = (int)input;

    value = (value / ROUNDING) * ROUNDING;

    if ((int)input % ROUNDING > ROUNDING / 2 )
    {
        value += ROUNDING;
    }

    return value;
}

int main()
{
    printf("%d\n", beautify(70000.601562)); // 70000
    printf("%d\n", beautify(72089.601562)); // 70000
    printf("%d\n", beautify(76089.601562)); // 75000
    printf("%d\n", beautify(79089.601562)); // 80000
    printf("%d\n", beautify(70000.601562)); // 70000

    return 0;
}
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is it objective-c?) –  itruf Apr 29 '12 at 21:37
3  
Yes. The function beatify is plain C, which you can use in your Objective-C project. Remember that Objective-C is just C with some additions. If you want you can make it into an Obj-C method, but there is no need really. You can keep it as a C function, just place it outside your class. –  Joe Apr 29 '12 at 21:43
    
I will try it, thank you. –  itruf Apr 29 '12 at 21:48

It depends whether you want a floor value, a ceiling value or just to round to the nearest 5000.

For a floor value:

int beautiful = (int)(floor(ugly / 5000.0) * 5000.0);

For a ceiling value:

int beautiful = (int)(ceil(ugly / 5000.0) * 5000.0);

For rounding:

int beautiful = (int)(round(ugly / 5000.0) * 5000.0);

For making graph lines, I'd probably find the minimum and maximum values you have to graph, start with a floor value for the minimum value and then add your desired interval until you have surpassed your maximum value.

For instance:

float minValue = 2.34;
float maxValue = 7.72;
int interval = 1;
NSMutableArray *horizLines = [NSMutableArray array];
int line = (int)(floor(minValue / interval) * interval);
[horizLines addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:line]];
do {
    line = (int)(ceil(minValue / interval) * interval);
    [horizLines addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:line]];
    if (minValue >= maxValue) break;
    minValue = minValue + interval;
} 

Use as needed!

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If ugly number is 0.3, for example, will it work? I think, that no. –  itruf Apr 29 '12 at 21:30
1  
What do you mean it "won't work"? In your example you were talking about rounding by 5000, and that's what his examples do. –  Michael Frederick Apr 29 '12 at 21:36
    
I want dynamic rounding for all numbers. From 0.0000000003 to 99999 –  itruf Apr 29 '12 at 21:38
2  
There's a problem with that request: it's far too open-ended. Do you want a linear graph or a logarithmic one? What if your min value is 0.0004 and your max value is 9999? Which one is used to create the beautiful intervals? And can we assume you want the "nearest 5", no matter what the level of precision is? And, do you just want the "nearest 5" above and below a certain number, or, as your question states, are you graphing values, which would indicate multiple values? –  mbm29414 Apr 29 '12 at 21:40
1  
I'm just glad that beautiful isn't a subjective thing, that makes it a whole lot easier! For the most beautiful rounding, just convert the value to PI. Mathematicians will agree that the value would become one of the most beautiful out there! –  JustSid Apr 29 '12 at 21:50

Well, it seems like you'd want it to scale based on the size of the number. If the range only goes to 10, then obviously rounding to the nearest 5,000 doesn't make sense. There's probably a really elegant way to code it using bit shifting but just something like this will do the trick:

float value = 72089.601562
int beautiful = 0;

// EDIT to support returning a float for small numbers:
if (value < 0.2) beautiful = int(value*100)/100.;
else if (value < 2.) beautiful = int(value*10)/10.;

// Anything bigger is easy:
else if (value < 20) beautiful = (int)value;
else if (value < 200) beautiful = (int)value/10;
else if (value < 2000) beautiful = (int)value/100;
else if (value < 20000) beautiful = (int)value/1000;
// etc
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it returns full number, but it should be divisible by 5, and your method isn't working for very little numbers. For example: 0.042. Beautiful for it: 0.05 –  itruf Apr 29 '12 at 21:37
    
It's pretty trivial to extend the algorithm for smaller values... –  buildsucceeded Apr 29 '12 at 21:38
    
yes, but it returns full value only. It isn't my target. –  itruf Apr 29 '12 at 21:39
    
see edit for support of returning a rounded beautiful float for small numbers –  buildsucceeded Apr 29 '12 at 21:48
1  
what the hell is a "full value"? –  JustSid Apr 29 '12 at 21:52

Sounds like what you want to do is round to 1 or perhaps 2 significant digits. Rounding to n significant digits is pretty easy:

double roundToNDigits(double x, int n) {
    double basis = pow(10.0, floor(log10(x)) - (n-1));
    return basis * round(x / basis);
}

This will give you roundToNDigits(74518.7, 1) == 70000.0 and roundToNDigits(7628.54, 1) == 8000.00

If you want to round to 1 or 2 digits (only 2 where the second digit is 5), you want something like:

double roundSpecial(double x) {
    double basis = pow(10.0, floor(log10(x))) / 2.0;
    return basis * round(x / basis);
}
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Aw man... you did it the smart way. –  buildsucceeded Apr 29 '12 at 21:53

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