Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a typical relation one to many, when I delete like:

var orderEntity = context.Orders.Single(o => o.orderID == entityID);
var baddetail = orderEntity.OrderDetails
                           .Single(od => od.orderDetailID == badOrderDetailID);
orderEntity.OrderDetails.Remove(baddetail);

I obtain the error:

The operation failed: The relationship could not be changed because one 
or more of the foreign-key properties is non-nullable. When a change is made 
to a relationship, the related foreign-key property is set to a null value. 
If the foreign-key does not support null values, a new relationship must 
be defined, the foreign-key property must be assigned another non-null value, 
or the unrelated object must be deleted.

As a solution was proposed to extend the DBContext.SaveChanges()

public override int SaveChanges()
    {

        foreach (OrderDetails od in this.OrderDetails.ToList())
        {
            // Remove OrderDetails without Order.
            if (od.Order == null)
            {
                this.OrderDetail.Remove(od);
            }
        }

        return base.SaveChanges();
    }

But is checking for OrderDetails with null Orders, when orderID is not nullable seem`s odd. How is the proper way of doing this ?

EDIT: As an example this odd deleting is happening when you expose through binding your Order.OrderDetails to and DataGrid.

share|improve this question
    
What kind of datagrid? Is this ASP.NET or WPF or WinForms...? The solution is in the proper usage of the grid (handling delete events for example), so that you can call Remove as explained in the answers. The overridden SaveChanges solution in your question is horrible. –  Slauma Apr 29 '12 at 22:26
    
Well, that solution was in msdn tutorial - Using Local to clean up entities in SaveChanges. With WPF DataGrid, in my case, hooking is easy but it comes with extending the Order[Service/Repository] with some method like DeleteOrderDetail(Order parent, OrderDetail children). I was asking myself if this behavior can be implemented at ModelCreation. –  Ciobanu Ion Apr 29 '12 at 22:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can just do this way:

var orderEntity = context.Orders.Single(o => o.orderID == entityID);
var baddetail = orderEntity.OrderDetails.Single(od => od.orderDetailID == badOrderDetailID);
context.OrderDetails.Remove(baddetail);

Because in your example you are not deleting entity. You are deleting relationship. So it tries to set null to your FK column and, of it is not nullable you will get and exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, my explanation might have been misleading. See my edit to understand why orderEntity.OrderDetails.Remove(baddetail); can't be substituted with context.OrderDetails.Remove(baddetail); –  Ciobanu Ion Apr 29 '12 at 22:06
    
Well if there is no other solution than this, I`m marking this as an answer. –  Ciobanu Ion Apr 30 '12 at 8:44
1  
When you work with EF you have relationship as a separate 'object'. So you can remove relationship between 2 objects without removing those acttual objects. When you work via orderEntity.OrderDetails.Remove(baddetail); you are deleting relationship, not actual object. So to delete object you must call remove on objects DbSet explictly. Ant it will remove object and relationship. –  Alexey Anufriyev Apr 30 '12 at 10:16

You are removing the OrderDetail from the Order's objects collection of OrderDetails. This is simply setting the OrderDetail's ID effectively to null and not marking it for deletion. This is not allowed as the FK from the OrderDetail to the Order table in the database is not nullable.

You should be doing

var orderEntity = context.Orders.Single(o => o.orderID == entityID);
var baddetail = orderEntity.OrderDetails
                       .Single(od => od.orderDetailID == badOrderDetailID);

context.OrderDetails.Remove(baddetail);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.