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I am attempting to call a C++/CLI class method from a managed caller. The managed assembly defines a class which is the input type to the C++/CLI function, and responds to changes to the variables in the managed class via OnPropertyChanged events. When one of the event changed handlers fires it calls into the C++/CLI passing the data.

C#:

namespace managedA
{
    class clsA
    {
        //The rest of clsA defined elsewhere
        partial void initialise()
        {
            this.PropertyChanged += delegate(object o, System.ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventArgs args)
            {
                if (args.PropertyName == "myvar")
                {
                    CalcMyVar();
                }
            }
        }

        void CalcMyVar()
        {
            cppcli::Calc _calc = new cppcli::Calc();
            _calc.DoSomething(this);
        }
    }
}

C++/CLI:

namespace cppcli
{
public ref class Calc       
    {
    public:

        managed::clsA ^ DoSomething(managed::clsA ^ input)
        {
            ...
        }
    }
}

The problem I have is caused by a circular dependency of the managed caller on itself via the C++/CLI. I have tried declaring an interface class in an intermediate project that the callee (cppcli:Calc) inherits from, but this didn't work as the intermediate project always needs to know about managed::clsA at the point cppcli::Calc is declared. It seems that however I declare cppcli::Calc (e.g. abstracting managed::clsA with Object), I always eventually need a reference to managed::ClsA somewhere in the declaration. How can I declare cppcli::Calc in such a way that the types are abstracted in the declaration?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
You are going to have to work bottom-up. And declare an interface class in your C++/CLI code that declares an interface that your C# code can implement. How DoSomething() could return a reference to a concrete instance of the interface is something you have to think about. That can't really work. –  Hans Passant Apr 29 '12 at 21:51

1 Answer 1

Well just to be clear, I wouldn't refer to C++/CLI as unmanaged and the other parts of your app as managed, because all specifically C++/CLI code is managed. Only the native C++ code that you use is unmanaged. At least that's how I understand it.

Anyway, moving on, if the C++/CLI part of you application is acting like a utility, then I would recommend declaring a base class in the C++/CLI portion that you inherit in the application ("managed" as you call it) portion of your software. This way the application portion includes and inherits from the C++/CLI portion, but the C++/CLI portion doesn't need to be aware of your application layer. To give an untested example:

C++/CLI code

public ref class base
{
public:
   int a;
};

public ref class Calc
{
public:
   static void DoSomething(base^ p_base)
   {
      p_base.a = 5;
   }
}

Application Layer

//Include your C++/CLI code
public ref class app_class : public base
{
   void do_something()
   {
      Calc::DoSomething(this);
   }
} 

Anyway I didn't compile this, but I think you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. I'll give it a try and let you know how I get on. –  pdm2011 May 8 '12 at 13:42
    
In the end I created an intermediate class in C++/CLI which acts a container for instances of the types defined in the original C++/CLI class (managed::clsA). –  pdm2011 Oct 5 '12 at 21:38
    
In this way the application depends on the intermediate class and requests instances of business objects from it (class Calc in the original post) without having to depend directly on the business layer. This was achieved by registering the types of the business classes and creating instances of those types using reflection (ConstructorInfo). –  pdm2011 Oct 5 '12 at 21:52

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