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One of the limitation of JS that bugs me the most is the poor ability to isolate code's execution.

I want to be able to control the context in which the code is executed, Something that achieve a similar effect to what Script.createContext & Script.runInContext in node.js does (node is using binding to the V8 engine, so i can't emulate their implementation).

Here is the some reason why I want to isolate code execution:

  1. Isolate the code from the global namespace (the window object and the also the DOM) , but I however need to be able reference function call on objects exposed in the context which must be executed synchronous which makes it almost impossible using a WebWorker for isolation.
  2. By isolate the execution of code it would possible also be able to deallocate its definitions when no longer needed (memory management).

I know one may achieve partly isolated execution by loading script into a iframe, this approach is however very heavy and uses a lot memory for a second instance of the DOM which isn't needed for what I'm trying to do.

I need to share constructor definition and also definitions of object which are shared between the isolated containers/contexts which both must run on the main UI thread. Mainly i want to use these isolated containers to host plugins/modules (mini-applications) which each presents and dynamically updates a viewport by calling drawing commands on their own Context2D object.

If these containers are not running on the main UI thread it wold be painfully hard to proxy calls such as ctx.measureText() and ctx.drawImage() would be all useless as image objects can't be created in a Worker.

Does someone know of future specification that would make this possible?

Are there any current (hidden) browser-side APIs that could be used to achieve this?

Would it be better utilize a virtual machine like Goggle's Dart VM and also re-implement my current codebase? My current codebase is slightly above 20 000 lines of code.

Would it be better to re-implement the framework in *

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4  
Do you have an existing problem that must be fixed like this? IIABDFI. –  minitech Apr 29 '12 at 23:01
    
Agree with the comment, but downvote is a bit unnecessary. –  Starx Apr 29 '12 at 23:06
    
@minitech I do actually have a problem with the lack of sandoxes (which is a better word for what i described above) in the browser runtime, due to i'm trying to achieve a plugin architecture for my client-side platform, which is written in JavaScript and utilizes the browser runtime for such. The platform is generic and it's main purpose is host the environment for dynamically loading and control plugins/modules/mini-application which provides the platform with additional features. –  Raweden Jun 26 '12 at 18:05
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4 Answers

The closest library I've seen for this is Caja.

Basically, in non-strict javascript code, there are many ways to get access to the global object (window in browsers), making true isolation a very hard problem. Caja does some iframing trickery to patch this, but to be honest I'm not exactly sure how it works.

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You can isolate your code from the global namespace with a simple self executing function object:

(function() {
   // all your code goes here
   // nobody outside of your code can reach your top level variables here
   // your top level variables are not on the window object

   // this is a protected, but top level variable
   var x = 3;

   // if you want anything to be global, you can assign it to the window object.
   window.myGlobal = {};

   function myTopLevelFunction(x,y,z) {
       // code here
   }

})();

If you want to have multiple ones of these execution contexts and be able to share between them, then you will have to rendezvous via one publicly known location, either a truly global variable or a property on a known DOM object or something like that. It is relatively common to declare one global namespace object and use properties off that for any access to things you're sharing among modules. I know it isn't completely perfect, but it works. Here's an example of the rendevous using a single global namespace object:

// module AAA
(function() {
   // module AAA code goes here

   // set up global namespace object and whatever references we want to be global
   window.myModuleTop = window.myModuleTop || {};
   myModuleTop.AAA = {};
   myModuleTop.AAA.myFuncA = function() {};

})();


// module BBB
(function() {
   // module BBB code goes here

   // set up global namespace object and whatever references we want to be global
   window.myModuleTop = window.myModuleTop || {};
   myModuleTop.BBB = {};
   myModuleTop.BBB.myFuncB = function() {};

})();
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I am not sure if this is the type of isolation OP is asking. (But I am not sure I understand him too) –  Starx Apr 29 '12 at 23:07
    
@Matt, I'm not trying to keep the OP's code from getting back to window. That's always easy. I'm trying to keep other people out of the OP's code and keep the OP's code isolated from other people's code. –  jfriend00 Apr 29 '12 at 23:08
    
@jfriend00 yeah I think there's some confusion on what the OP is looking for –  Matt Apr 29 '12 at 23:10
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Isolate the code from the global namespace

You can use a self-executing anonymous function:

(function(variables,you,want) {
/* your code here */
})(vaariables,passed,tofn);

Why does this work?

JavaScript has function scope, meaning any variables declared with var inside a function remain inside that function only. Important : not using var leaks variables into the global scope (window object in most browsers), so always use var, and never work inside the global scope. Always use an anonymous function. Anything inside () is evaluated by javascript, so the function is evaluated and can then be run like a normal function.

I want to be able to control the context in which the code is executed, Something that achieve a similar effect to what Script.createContext & Script.runInContext

Turns out JavaScript already has a way of doing this. You can use .apply() or .call() on a function. Ben Nadel has an excellent write up on how to use call and apply, as well as how execution scope works. I really recommend you read it.

Basically, it works like this.

(function(){
    var foo = {
        bar : "baz"
    };
    var bar = "notbaz";
    (function(){
        var baz = this.bar;
        console.log(baz); //echoes "baz"
    }).call(foo); // You can use functions or objects,
                  // although in JS functions are objects ;)
    (function(){
        var baz = this.bar;
        console.log(baz); // echoes "notbaz"
     }).call(this);  //executes within scope it is called in,
                     // in this case our anonymous function.
})();

You can read up on the difference between call and apply on this StackOverflow Question.

I need to share constructor definition

I'd recommend taking a look at RequireJS for making your object definitions modular and maintainable. You could also define them in the global namespace using Java-esque "packages" like matt.app.Thing. I prefer using RequireJS, but use what is right for your project.

If these containers are not running on the main UI thread it wold be painfully hard to proxy calls such as ctx.measureText() and ctx.drawImage() would be all useless as image objects can't be created in a Worker.

It wouldn't be "painfully hard", you just need the right architectural pattern. You really don't want your workers to be talking directly to objects in the main thread, this can cause all sorts of memory issues properly. The main communication of WebWorkers to the main UI thread is messages, so you'll really want to do some research. I'd recommend Large Scale JavaScript Patterns by Addy Osmani, which is based on work by the excellent Nicholas C. Zakas's Sandbox Pattern.

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Is "standard" namespacing an option? Like:

var myNamespace = {};

myNamespace.myFunc = function() { return true; }

This approach is the simplest I can think of and may be the solution to many problems. Although not a real sandbox, it can let the code less error prone.

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