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I need to be able to copy a text file to another location and then delete the contents of this text file (without deleting the file).

At the moment I am doing this:

#!/bin/bash

count=0

    for filename in `find . -name "*_list" -print`
    do
      while read -r line
      do
        echo $line 
        sync
        echo "### Trace Info ###" > log.txt
        sync
        python worker.py "$line"
        echo $line > traces/trace$count.txt
        sync
        sync
        sleep 1
        sync
        sync
        cp log.txt traces/trace$count.txt
        #cp log.txt traces/log.txt
        sync
        sleep 1
        count=$((count+1))
      done < $filename
    done

But calling sync and sleep it not working for me, instead I get file like this: (NOTE: the python file is not writing to log.txt CacheGrind is.)

CachegrindMemMod/vg-in-place --tool=cachegrind --trace-children=yes /usr/sbin/mysqld 2>log.txt

cat trace10.txt | xxd
0000000: 2323 2320 5472 6163 6520 496e 666f 2023  ### Trace Info #
0000010: 2323 0a00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ##..............
0000020: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000030: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000040: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000050: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000060: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000070: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000080: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0000090: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
00000a0: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
00000b0: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
00000c0: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................

This trace has 4 megs of zeros which should have been text.

ls -la trace10.txt 
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4350121 2012-04-29 15:34 trace10.txt

I am guessing there is some caching going on that is preventing me from being able to get the accrual text. Any ideas would be great.

If you are interested the file should contain a list of memory addresses retrieved from a modified version of CacheGrind that looks like this:

Dw: 0x4916e30
Dw: 0x4916df0
Dw: 0x4916db0
Dw: 0x4916d70
Dr: 0x4916d30
Dr: 0x4916cf0
Dr: 0x4916cb0
Dr: 0x4916c70
Dr: 0x4916c30
Dr: 0x4916bf0
Dr: 0x4916bb0
Dr: 0x4916b70
Dr: 0x4916b30
Dr: 0x4916af0
Dr: 0x4916ab0

Also modified version of CacheGrind can be found here

Additional Info: I noticed some file only contain the header and no null data. This also leads me to think its an I/O caching problem

share|improve this question
    
There's no need to start a subshell with $(...) to increment $count. You can do the same with count=$[count+1] –  dschulz Apr 29 '12 at 22:59
    
@dschulz: it's $((expr)) a different thing, and it's not executed in a subshell. –  Karoly Horvath Apr 29 '12 at 23:07
    
@KarolyHorvath I was wrong, thank you! TIL about $((expression)). For a long time I thought anything starting with $( had something to do with a subshell. –  dschulz Apr 30 '12 at 6:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Who's writing in that log.txt file? The python script? Is it working in the background? If so, why are trying to copy the (not completed) file? Why are you trying to sync in the bash script?

  • Extend the script so it allows the log file as a command line parameter, so each invocation is going to write to a separate file.
share|improve this answer
    
The python file is only executing commands against the program I am tracing. CacheGrind is writing to log.txt and it takes a bit for the initialization of this program and I only need the traces of specific commands and not the initialization. So I have to copy an incomplete file and delete the contents after I copy. I'll add the CacheGrind command above. –  kporter Apr 29 '12 at 23:04
    
that's very error prone, you will have timing issues. just process the output files with grep, awk, etc... –  Karoly Horvath Apr 29 '12 at 23:06
1  
Aha! Your problem is that nothing tells CacheGrind to seek back to the beginning of the file. It goes on from where it was, and the kernel fills the space in between with zeroes (which may not actually take up space on disk). I agree with Karoly, what you are trying to do is very error prone, you should just postprocess the file after cachegrind is done with it. –  Zack Apr 29 '12 at 23:06
    
@KarolyHorvath I do not know how this could be done. I suppose I could keep track of the line counts each time I would have copied to another file then process the file later with the line numbers to separate into different files. –  kporter Apr 29 '12 at 23:12
    
@Zack hmm interesting. I noticed there is some trace data at the bottom. I suppose this could be all the data (I was expecting more). So could it be that all the zeros is that CacheGrind continued to print at the same line and all the prior lines are zeroed out? –  kporter Apr 29 '12 at 23:13

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