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I'm working on a project that requires storing bitmaps on a table. These bitmaps are used in data adapters to be displayed on lists. This table can possibly contain more than 1000 images. The reason I'm currently not storing to file is because of how fast I can read and write images to db.

What I'm essentially looking for is to understand the limitations of SQLite's cursor. How is the cursor loaded into memory? Does it place the query results in memory or does it create some type of temp read/write file? I don't want to run into issues where querying a large datasets causes a device to run out of memory.

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There is CursorWindow and it seems to be a used to load just parts of the query whenever you moveToXyz. Data should come directly from the database. –  zapl Apr 29 '12 at 23:09
    
"I'm working on a project that requires storing bitmaps on a table." -- ick. "This table can possibly contain more than 1000 images." -- more ick. "The reason I'm currently not storing to file is because of how fast I can read and write images to db." -- by definition, a file will be as fast or faster, since SQLite has to store its stuff in a file. –  CommonsWare Apr 29 '12 at 23:11
    
zapl thanks for that info. @CommonsWare Not sure what ick means :P I think it appears that it should be fast or faster to read from file than db. I don't know much about cursors other than how to use them... but doesn't SQLite highly optimize how you read from it's data? I mean reading image data from file multiple times seems to be a lot slower than reading them from a cursor. –  Jona Apr 29 '12 at 23:33
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@Jona: That is because a Cursor holds things in memory. You can do that with the results of reading a file as well. –  CommonsWare Apr 30 '12 at 10:28

1 Answer 1

If I recall, it will keep however many results cached in memory it can. It should stay below the soft heap limit, usually. It is an advisory limit, so it will prefer to go over the limit than return SQL_NOMEM.

I don't believe it writes to disk for any caching mechanisms. So long as each image can fit in memory, and they aren't in the indexes, it shouldn't be an issue.

I am not an android programmer, for what it's worth. Some of these things could have been customized.

As background, sqlite_step is the cursor in the default library. I am unaware if android has implemented it's own mechanisms. You can find some general information on their page about dynamic memory allocation.

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