Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

As part of my Go tutorial, I'm writing simple program counting words across multiple files. I have a few go routines for processing files and creating map[string]int telling how many occurrence of particular word have been found. The map is then being sent to reducing routine, which aggregates values to a single map. Sounds pretty straightforward and looks like a perfect (map-reduce) task for Go!

I have around 10k document with 1.6 million unique words. What I found is my memory usage is growing fast and constantly while running the code and I'm running out of memory at about half way of processing (12GB box, 7GB free). So yes, it uses gigabytes for this small data set!

Trying to figure out where the problem lies, I found the reducer collecting and aggregating data is to blame. Here comes the code:

func reduceWords (input chan map[string]int, output chan int) {
  total := make(map[string]int)
  for wordMap := range input {
    for w, c := range wordMap {
      total[w] += c
    }
  }      
  output <- len(total)
}

If I remove the map from the sample above the memory stays within reasonable limits (a few hundred megabytes). What I found though, is taking copy of a string also solves the problem, i.e. the following sample doesn't eat up my memory:

func reduceWords (input chan map[string]int, output chan int) {
  total := make(map[string]int)
  for wordMap := range input {
    for w, c := range wordMap {
      copyW := make([]byte, len(w)) // <-- will put a copy here!
      copy(copyW, w)
      total[string(copyW)] += c
    }
  }  
  output <- len(total)
}

Is it possible it's a wordMap instance not being destructed after every iteration when I use the value directly? (As a C++ programmer I have limited intuition when comes to GC.) Is it desirable behaviour? Am I doing something wrong? Should I be disappointed with Go or rather with myself?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What does your code look like that turns files into strings? I would look for a problem there. If you are converting large blocks (whole files maybe?) to strings, and then slicing those into words, then you are pinning the entire block if you save any one word. Try keeping the blocks as []byte, slicing those into words, and then converting words to the string type individually.

share|improve this answer
    
Kudos for intuition, it was the problem itself! I forgot I have to think in slices from now on. I was converting each file into string at the very beginning as I found it faster, but didn't realise it's wrong. Thanks for help! – tomasz Apr 29 '12 at 23:26
    
@tomasz It should be impossible for the total memory consumption of your program to radically exceed the sum of sizes of files read by the program. I am assuming that each distinct file is read only once. What is the total size of those 10k documents? Is is more than 1 GB? – Atom Apr 30 '12 at 5:13
    
@Atom, that's correct, the documents are over 5GB in total. – tomasz Apr 30 '12 at 8:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.