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It appears Git is ignoring ~/.gitconfig

$ git config --global core.filemode false

$ git config -l
core.filemode=false
core.filemode=true

So now there are 2 entries for core.filemode and git is still not ignoring filemode changes

$ touch modetest

$ git add .

$ git commit -m test1
[master (root-commit) 320cfe4] test1
 0 files changed, 0 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 modetest

$ chmod +x modetest

$ git diff
diff --git a/modetest b/modetest
old mode 100644
new mode 100755

Based on torek’s answer, I added this line to my .bash_profile

[ -d .git ] && git config core.filemode false
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

When creating or reinitializing a new repo, git init always sets a new value for core.filemode based on the result of probing the file system. You'll just have to manually git config core.filemode false, or git config --unset core.filemode to make it respect the one in your ~/.gitconfig. If you run git init again the per-repo setting will go back to true on your system.

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2  
Not entirely sure how git actually implements it. I'd have to go dig into the source code. Ah, there it is: it depends on the git build-time configuration item NO_TRUSTABLE_FILEMODE. If that's not defined, it then tests at runtime by chmod-ing .git/config which it eventually replaces with .git/config.lock which wipes out its temporary chmod. The temporary version has the u+x bit set; if it stays set after chmod, git believes that the x bit matters. –  torek Apr 30 '12 at 0:14
    
this makes perfect sense, but nonetheless is frustrating, I had to copy a project from one computer to another 5 times until I realized what's going on)) thanks! –  Al Jey Nov 29 '13 at 12:09

If you have already committed the different file modes (permissions), you can fix it up with filter-branch. See:

Can I make git diff ignore permission changes

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(EDIT) so to resume, on windows we need to do :

git config --global --unset core.filemode
git config --unset core.filemode
git config core.filemode false

And you can create an empty config file in Git install dir for new git folders (init) :

C:\bin\Git\share\git-core\templates>echo > config
C:\bin\Git\share\git-core\templates>notepad config

And put inside :

[core]
filemode = false
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updated with a template to fix git init –  Tanguy Aug 24 at 16:37
    
Even with your edit, git init will still return filemode = true –  Steven Penny Aug 24 at 20:00

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