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I have two simple classes which mmap chunks of files, store the range tuples of chunks and return the actual chunk contents when you iter or getitem. I was trying to reorganize the code so that the Dict inherits from the list. Is this a bad way to do things? If not how can I make this work? I seem to be getting "instance lay-out conflicts". Maybe it's best to keep it simple and just call the list class inside the dict rather than inherit?

class mylist(list):
    def __init__(self):
        ...
    def __getitem__(self, k):
        ...
    def __iter__(self):
        ...

class mydict(collections.OrderedDict, mylist):
        def __init__(self):
        ...
    def __getitem__(self, k):
        ...
    def __iter__(self):
        ...
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closed as not a real question by casperOne Apr 30 '12 at 16:55

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It is a reasonable choice to use composition for this one rather than inheritance. Lists and dicts can't be in the same inheritance tree for implementation dependent reasons. Another alternative is to inherit from UserList instead of a regular list. That will avoid the layout conflict. –  Raymond Hettinger Apr 30 '12 at 0:09
    
Thanks! That's what I was wondering about. I suppose "instance lay-out conflicts" pretty much always mean there is some lower level structure that prevents combining two classes in an inheritance tree? –  mathtick Apr 30 '12 at 0:14
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