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What I have:

  • users are selling foobars on an auction site.
  • each foobar is identical.
  • price of foobar determined by user.
  • i will be scrapping each price listing to form a data set that looks like:
    $prices = ('foobar' => [12.34, 15.22, 14.18, 20.55, 9.50]);

What I need:

  • to find a realistic average market price for each day, week, month.

Problems I face:

  • Outlier rejection implimentations are not proving to work very well because the data is biased.
  • It is extremely unlikely that a user will commit their auction to way below average market price becuase it can not be undone. Even if it is way below market price, this instance will happen so infrequently that the overall average will not be affected. However, users that will try to drive their prices up is much more likely and will happen frequently enough to affect the realistic average marketplace value.

What I think I'm going to do about it:

Daniel Collicott:

if I understand you correctly, you want to calculate the optimal selling value of an item. (or are you trying to calculate the real value??)

Sellers are quite naturally gaming (e.g. ebay), trying to maximize their profits.

For this reason, I'd would avoid average/SD approaches: they are too sensitive to outliers created by particular selling tactics.

Game-theory-wise, I think clever sellers would estimate the highest likely selling price (maximal profits) by researching their competitors and their historical sales output: to find the sweet spot.

For this reason I would record a histogram of historical prices over all sellers and look at the distribution of prices, using something approaching the mode to determine the optimal price i.e. the most common sale price. Better still, I would weigh prices by the profit (proportional to historical sales volume) of each individual seller.

I suspect this would be nearer to your optimal market value; if you are looking for the real market value then comment below or contact me at my machine learning firm

Questions I have:

  • A more detailed explanation for the things refered to in @Daniel Collicott's post:

    --> optimal selling value
    --> real selling value
    --> algorithms for both

share|improve this question
    
What would you want your algorithm to do in the last two examples? –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 29 '12 at 23:48
3  
At the most fundamental level, you are simply looking for the median of the dataset. Is there other information you have that would give more insight to a small dataset? If not, there's nothing you can do mathematically speaking. –  Matthew Apr 29 '12 at 23:50
4  
Incidentally, you're talking about outlier rejection. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 29 '12 at 23:50
2  
In your last example, how do you know that it isn't the 12.34 and 15.66 that are the unreasonable outliers? –  sarnold Apr 29 '12 at 23:59
    
@sarnold Once a user confirms their auction post, they are commited to it. It is extremely unlikely that a user will run down prices rather than run them up. –  Dan Kanze Apr 30 '12 at 0:01
show 18 more comments

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

If all you want to do is normalise your dataset - i.e. to converge on a set that that reflects the mean then you could use the Kurtosis and Skewness to characterise the structure of your dataset to help identify outliers - (compute the metrics for each point using the rest of the dataset aim to minimise Kurtois and preserve the tendancy of the Skewness - reject extreme values and repeat until excluding a value doesn't significantly change metrics).

But your problem is a bit more interesting:

Let me see if I've got this right: You have an imperfect understanding of the foobar market, but you have access to limited concrete information about it.

You want to use your limited dataset to predict hidden information about the market.

You need the Bayesian Average (see also Bayesian Inference).

Let's assume you have 1000 prices per day;

For each day, compute: mean, mode, median, stdev, kurtosis and skewness - this gives a handle of the shape of the market:

  • mean & median will show how prices are moving
  • mode & stdev will show how mature the market is (mature markets should have lower stdev)
  • kurtosis will show price elasticity - low values are elastic, higher are more plastic - also relates to maturity
  • skewness will show trends in demand - a long tail to the left indicates bargin hunters, a tail to the right indicates willingness to pay higher prices

Comparing daily values will enable you to measure the health of the market.

Once you have a few weeks worth of trend data (it gets better over time) you can start testing for true prices.

  1. In the first instance take an educated guess at the true price on the first day of your dataset.
  2. Compute a Bayesian average price for the market using a skew weighted sample of prices, but sample no more than 80% / stddev^2 of the daily set
  3. This now becomes your true price.
  4. Repeating 2 - 4 for each day should give you a slowly moving price.

If the true prices are jumping around then either the sample size is too small or the market isn't functioning properly (i.e. some of the participants are paying above the value, selling below value, supply is restricted, purchase price isn't related to value, etc).

I've had a go modelling used car prices (they're not homogenous) but I did get some reasonable convergence - +/- 10% but that was on a limited dataset. It would also seem to work with house prices, not commodities or football scores.

It's never going to give you a definitive predictive answer, especially not in an auction environment - but it should get you a lot closer to the true price than an arithmetic mean would.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like what I want. I am very curious to see how this will handle against a large dataset. I will be avidly waiting for your implimentation. –  Dan Kanze May 16 '12 at 13:42
add comment

Your first problem pretty straightforward using the average and the standard deviation:

$prices = array
(
    'bar' => array(12.34, 102.55),
    'foo' => array(12.34, 15.66, 102.55, 134.66),
    'foobar' => array(12.34, 15.22, 14.18, 20.55, 99.50, 15.88, 16.99, 102.55),
);

foreach ($prices as $item => $bids)
{
    $average = call_user_func_array('Average', $bids);
    $standardDeviation = call_user_func_array('standardDeviation', $bids);

    foreach ($bids as $key => $bid)
    {
        if (($bid < ($average - $standardDeviation)) || ($bid > ($average + $standardDeviation)))
        {
            unset($bids[$key]);
        }
    }

    $prices[$item] = $bids;
}

print_r($prices);

Basically you just need to remove bids lower than avg - stDev or higher than avg + stDev.


And the actual functions (ported from my framework):

function Average()
{
    if (count($arguments = func_get_args()) > 0)
    {
        return array_sum($arguments) / count($arguments);
    }

    return 0;
}

function standardDeviation()
{
    if (count($arguments = func_get_args()) > 0)
    {
        $result = call_user_func_array('Average', $arguments);

        foreach ($arguments as $key => $value)
        {
            $arguments[$key] = pow($value - $result, 2);
        }

        return sqrt(call_user_func_array('Average', $arguments));
    }

    return 0;
}

Output (demo):

Array
(
    [bar] => Array
        (
            [0] => 12.34
            [1] => 102.55
        )

    [foo] => Array
        (
            [1] => 15.66
            [2] => 102.55
        )

    [foobar] => Array
        (
            [0] => 12.34
            [1] => 15.22
            [2] => 14.18
            [3] => 20.55
            [5] => 15.88
            [6] => 16.99
        )
)
share|improve this answer
1  
You're treating anything outside 1-sigma as an outlier? –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 0:12
    
@OliCharlesworth: Yes, after I answered I realized that this approach doesn't solve the OP 2nd and 3rd problems, so I edited accordingly. –  Alix Axel Apr 30 '12 at 0:23
    
@AlixAxel I'm sorry I didn't include this in my post but in 2nd and 3rd cases, I would assume group of like elements with smallest average. So 'foo' => array(12.34, 15.66, 102.55, 134.66) would need to return 12.34 and 15.66. –  Dan Kanze Apr 30 '12 at 0:25
    
@DanKanze: Yeah, I'm sorry too, I just realized that after posting. I've an idea to get the 3rd case right, but the second one baffles me. –  Alix Axel Apr 30 '12 at 0:30
add comment

Ok, after a lot of struggling here is a solution that seems to work regardless of how extreme (or not) are max the outliers. Bare in mind that my math knowledge is pretty raw so take this with a grain of salt.

$prices = array
(
    'baz' => array(12.34, 15.66),
    'bar' => array(12.34, 102.55),
    'foo' => array(12.34, 15.66, 102.55, 134.66),
    'foobar' => array(12.34, 15.22, 14.18, 20.55, 99.50, 15.88, 16.99, 102.55),
);

foreach ($prices as $item => $bids)
{
    $average = average($bids);
    $standardDeviation = standardDeviation($bids);

    foreach ($bids as $key => $bid)
    {
        if ($bid > ($average + ($average - $standardDeviation)))
        {
            unset($bids[$key]);
        }
    }

    $prices[$item] = $bids;
}

print_r($prices);

function average($arguments)
{
    if (count($arguments) > 0)
    {
        return array_sum($arguments) / count($arguments);
    }

    return 0;
}

function standardDeviation($arguments)
{
    if (count($arguments) > 0)
    {
        $result = Average($arguments);

        foreach ($arguments as $key => $value)
        {
            $arguments[$key] = pow($value - $result, 2);
        }

        return sqrt(Average($arguments));
    }

    return 0;
}

Output (demo):

Array
(
    [baz] => Array
        (
            [0] => 12.34
            [1] => 15.66
        )

    [bar] => Array
        (
            [0] => 12.34
        )

    [foo] => Array
        (
            [0] => 12.34
            [1] => 15.66
        )

    [foobar] => Array
        (
            [0] => 12.34
            [1] => 15.22
            [2] => 14.18
            [3] => 20.55
            [5] => 15.88
            [6] => 16.99
        )
)
share|improve this answer
    
I changed question slightly. Hopefully I am more clear this time. Added a bounty. –  Dan Kanze May 10 '12 at 16:25
add comment

Dan, reading your comments I'm starting to think what you want can be achieved very simply. This is in C# but it is so simple it should be easy to understand:

const double reasonable_price_range = 1.5;
List<double> prices = new List<double> { 50.00, 51.00, 52.00, 100.00, 101.00, 102.00, 150.00, 151.00, 152.00 };
double min = prices.Min();
var reasonable_prices = (from p in prices where p <= min * reasonable_price_range select p).ToList();

Discard all numbers which are larger than the smallest price by a certain percentage (percentage is the best measure here IMO), then return the rest.

This should work for all your examples. The 1.5 constant is arbitrary and should probably be higher (the question is, if we know price X is reasonable, how high can the price go and still be considered reasonable?). However, this relies on there not being even a single low outlier - the lowest price on the list must be a reasonable one.

Of course, min * constant is not necessarily the optimal decision function, but if we can rely on the min never being an outlier, the problem becomes much simpler, as instead of grouping elements we can compare them to the minimum element in some way.

share|improve this answer
    
I changed question slightly. Hopefully I am more clear this time. Added a bounty. –  Dan Kanze May 10 '12 at 16:25
add comment

If I understand you correctly, you want to calculate the optimal selling value of an item. (or are you trying to calculate the real value??)

Sellers are quite naturally gaming (e.g. ebay), trying to maximize their profits.

For this reason, I'd would avoid average/SD approaches: they are too sensitive to outliers created by particular selling tactics.

Game-theory-wise, I think clever sellers would estimate the highest likely selling price (maximal profits) by researching their competitors and their historical sales output: to find the sweet spot.

For this reason I would record a histogram of historical prices over all sellers and look at the distribution of prices, using something approaching the mode to determine the optimal price i.e. the most common sale price. Better still, I would weigh prices by the profit (proportional to historical sales volume) of each individual seller.

I suspect this would be nearer to your optimal market value; if you are looking for the real market value then comment below or contact me at my machine learning firm

share|improve this answer
    
Optimal market value sounds very close to what I want. Could you go into more detail about what "real" market value is? I don't quite understand the difference. –  Dan Kanze May 11 '12 at 14:30
    
I would define the optimum market value as the selling price that maximises the total sales profit (over a given time window); the 'real' value would be defined as the intrinsic worth of the goods i.e. roughly what it takes to produces the goods (materials and labour) but ignoring any additional perceived value e.g. that created by marketing or market speculation and the associated costs of distorting this intrinsic value e.g. advertising & distribution models. –  Daniel Collicott Oct 7 '12 at 14:34
    
Given that you are looking for the optimum market value, you need to estimate the intrinsic value of the goods in order to calculate the per-item profit at a given price point e.g. a working definition of 'real' value might be calculated by interpolating wholesale prices at different volumes-price breaks. –  Daniel Collicott Oct 7 '12 at 14:34
    
The optimum market value will then maximise the function (profit per item)*(sales volume), bearing in mind that both components are a function of the selling and potentially, the minimum asking price. Then if I were selling items, I would start by offering something near to the estimated mode and then repeatedly refine this value using machine learning to maximise the total sales profit. –  Daniel Collicott Oct 7 '12 at 14:34
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