Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm looking into making a mockable DataContext that I can use in unit tests. One approach is described here. However, the problem with this approach is that changes to the repository have effect immediately--before Commit (or any other equivalent to SubmitChanges) is called.

On the flip-side, to include the correct SubmitChanges behavior would involve duplication a lot of complicated code from DataContext, and would potentially lead to more bugs.

Is the naive implementation of a mocked in-memory repository (that does not wait for SubmitChanges) feasible for use unit tests? How is this typically done?

share|improve this question
1  
I think you are on the right track. If you want to unit test what you do with the repository (not the repository itself), a mocked in-memory repository is a neat way to go. You can also use mocking frameworks, like Moq. –  dan radu Apr 30 '12 at 1:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What is the class/component under test? If you are not directly testing the repository and only testing something that is consuming a repository then the mock can be as basic as you need.

However, if you are wanting to perform integration testing end to end between a component and the repository another approach will be needed eg. running against a test database.

share|improve this answer
    
So your suggestion is: Use the naive mocked DataContext for unit testing, use the real DataContext with a test database for integration testing. Sounds reasonable. I'll wait for me feedback and see if the naive mocked DataContext causes any problems as I'm writing my unit tests. –  Matthew Pirocchi Apr 30 '12 at 2:08

If my understanding is correct, you have not completely identified your SUT (Subject Under Test).

  • If you want to test the connectivity with the database, then we are talking about an Integration Test and you should not mock your DataContext

  • If you want to test the logic that calls the DataContext then it's a unit test

In any case I would suggest you to wrap the call to the DataContext in a repository, the repository will be in charge to talk to the database, and following this approach will make things easier for you

I will clarify it with an example and at the end I will recommend you several links that will help you write testable code. (I always say this and I will say it again, write tests is easy, the real effort must be put in write clean testable code)

public interface IMyRepository
{
   void ChangeEmail(int employeeId, string newEmail);
}
public class MyRepository : IMyRepository
{
   private MyDataContext context;
   public MyRepository(MyDataContext context)
   {
      this.context = context;
   }
   public void ChangeEmail(int employeeId, string newEmail)
   {
      //save your email using your context
   }
}

Now in your consumer code you would inject your repository:

public class MyCommand
{
   public MyCommand(IMyRepository myRepository)
   ...
   public void ChangeEmail(int employeeId, string newEmail)
   {
      //adding condition just to clarify how to test
      if(this.AllowChangeEmail(employeeId))
      {
         this.myRepository.ChangeEmail(employeeId, newEmail);
      }
      else
      {
         throw new DomainException("this should not happen");
      }
   }
   ...
}

We have decoupled the use of the DataContext, from the perspective of your domain code, the DataContext does not exist, the only code the domain knows is the IMyRepository and since it's an interface you can change the provider easily changing the behavior of your application without refactoring your domain code

If you notice I have not talked about tests yet, Why? because like I said, the first thing to do is to write clean testable code (do not misunderstand this, a TDD should be followed, which means that the tests should be written first, I am following this approach just as demonstration) now that we have this code let's see how easy is to test the logic of our application I will write a stub for the IMyRepository manually to clarify but in real code an auto mock object should be used instead, using tools like AutoFixture, FluentAssertions and Moq

public class MyFakeProvider : IMyRepository
{
   public void ChangeEmail(int employeeId, string newEmail)
   {
      //write some assert here indicating the method was called
   }
}

[Test]
public void MyTest()
{
   var myMock = new MyFakeProvider();
   var sut = new MyCommand(myMock);

   sut.Invoking(x => x.ChangeEmail(3, "my@email.com")).ShouldNotThrow();
}

These links are focused on one thing only: write testable code:

http://misko.hevery.com/code-reviewers-guide/

http://misko.hevery.com/attachments/Guide-Writing%20Testable%20Code.pdf

http://misko.hevery.com/presentations/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEhu57pih5w&feature=player_embedded

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlfLCWKxHJ0&feature=player_embedded

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FRm3VPhseI&feature=player_embedded

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4F72VULWFvc&feature=player_embedded

share|improve this answer

I created an interface to represent the repository, which has SubmitChanges, InsertOnSubmit, etc. Things that the DataContext implements. Also, IQueryable properties for your tables. Your DataContext subclass can then implement this interface, and you shouldn't need to do anything. For your unit tests, you can just create a mock, and to mimic the IQueryables you can create Lists and use the AsQueryable method.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.