Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have three tables: grade, assignments, user. I want to be able to find the assignments the user has and has not completed. I know we use OUTER joins here, but I just can't seem to get the correct SQL to replciate what I want. In my tables, 1 student has completed 1 assignment (shows 1, 3, 1 student has compelted 2 assignments, 1 student has compelted 3 assignments, have completeTables posted below

assignment table:

assignmentID |  assignmentType | totalScore |
-------------|-----------------|------------|
      1      |   Assignment    |    100     |
      2      |   Assignment    |    100     |
      3      |   Assignment    |    100     |
      4      |   Test          |    200     |

grade table:

gradeID  |  studentID  |  assignmentID  |  grade  |
---------|-------------|----------------|---------|
   1     |      3      |       1        |    100  | 
   2     |      3      |       2        |    100  |                
   3     |      3      |       3        |    100  |                
   4     |      2      |       1        |    100  |                
   5     |      2      |       2        |    100  |                
   6     |      1      |       1        |    100  | 

student table:

studentID  | studentName |
-----------|-------------|
     1     |     John    |     
     2     |     Jane    |
     3     |     Joe     |

So in the scenario above, John would have 1 assignment complete, 3 incomplete, Jane would have 2 complete, 2 incomplete, and Joe would have 3 complete and 1 incomplete.

Would like output to be:

studentID | achievementID | grade |
----------|---------------|-------|
    1     |       1       |  100  |
    1     |       2       |  NULL |
    1     |       3       |  NULL |
    1     |       4       |  NULL |
    2     |       1       |  100  |
    2     |       2       |  100  |
    2     |       3       |  NULL |
    2     |       4       |  NULL |
    3     |       1       |  100  |
    3     |       2       |  100  |
    3     |       3       |  100  |
    3     |       4       |  NULL |

Any help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
your grade table has all the same studentId –  Michael Buen Apr 30 '12 at 0:28
    
Oops, I edited. –  OneSneakyMofo Apr 30 '12 at 0:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your new requirement: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/23408/23

select s.studentID, 

    a.assignmentID as achievementID,
    g.grade

from student s
cross join assignment a

left join grade g 
on g.studentId = s.studentId
and g.assignmentID = a.assignmentID

order by s.studentID, achievementID

Output:

STUDENTID    ACHIEVEMENTID    GRADE
1            1                100
1            2    
1            3    
1            4    
2            1                100
2            2                100
2            3    
2            4    
3            1                100
3            2                100
3            3                100
3            4    

sqlfiddle doesn't present NULLs as NULL on its output. Nonetheless, the underlying empty values on the empty grades above are NULL


You can also use table comma table, instead of using CROSS JOIN; but this is generally frowned upon. It's easy to commit unintentional cartesian products with table comma tables, imagine how many rows will be produced on three or more tables with comma tables approach. That's why JOIN (INNER,LEFT,CROSS,FULL,NATURAL) keyword was introduced to SQL so as to make the code intent more clear

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/23408/37

select s.studentID, 

    a.assignmentID as achievementID,
    g.grade

from (student s, assignment a)

left join grade g 
on g.studentId = s.studentId
and g.assignmentID = a.assignmentID

order by s.studentID, achievementID

I would rather use CROSS JOIN keyword than using table comma table. CROSS JOIN formalize the notion of cartesian products. And JOINs in general formalizes what you wanted to achieve in your query. With table comma tables it's hard to infer from the query if your tables will end up in inner-join-y operation or left-join-y operation, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much. Can you actually explain this please so I can learn? I have never used cross join before. –  OneSneakyMofo Apr 30 '12 at 4:10
2  
CROSS JOIN just emit all possible combinations on given sets. e.g. sqlfiddle.com/#!2/75f7a/5 –  Michael Buen Apr 30 '12 at 4:20
    
Ahhhh okay. So it's just a fancier way of doing a nested SELECT statement. So you take ALL of the sets an subtract the OUTER ones and that provides the null values. Thanks. –  OneSneakyMofo Apr 30 '12 at 5:04
    
Yes, that nesting of select is technically called cartesian product. So if you have 30 rows on one table and then 20 rows on another, the query will return a total of 600 rows. Regarding NULL, that came from LEFT JOIN. If a value from first table doesn't exist on second table, your database will return null for those columns of second table. If you use INNER JOIN, your database will not include rows that doesn't exist on both first table and second table, hence you'll never see NULL values with INNER JOIN. Try to change the LEFT JOIN to INNER JOIN sqlfiddle.com/#!2/23408/23 –  Michael Buen Apr 30 '12 at 6:03
    
"sqlfiddle doesn't present NULLs as NULL on its output" -- try something like COALESCE(g.grade, '<NULL>') AS grade –  onedaywhen Apr 30 '12 at 7:41

Try this: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/23408/15

select s.studentID, s.studentName,


    count(g.assignmentID) as completed,
    count(a.assignmentID) - count(g.assignmentID) as incomplete,

    count(a.assignmentID) as total

from student s
cross join assignment a

left join grade g 
on g.studentId = s.studentId
and g.assignmentID = a.assignmentID

group by s.studentId

Output:

STUDENTID       STUDENTNAME     COMPLETED       INCOMPLETE      TOTAL
1               John            1               3               4
2               Jane            2               2               4
3               Joe             3               1               4

Sample data:

CREATE TABLE assignment
    (assignmentID int, assignmentType varchar(10), totalScore int);

INSERT INTO assignment
    (assignmentID, assignmentType, totalScore)
VALUES
    (1, 'Assignment', 100),
    (2, 'Assignment', 100),
    (3, 'Assignment', 100),
    (4, 'Test', 200);



CREATE TABLE student
    (studentID int, studentName varchar(4));

INSERT INTO student
    (studentID, studentName)
VALUES
    (1, 'John'),
    (2, 'Jane'),
    (3, 'Joe');

CREATE TABLE grade
    (gradeID int, studentID int, assignmentID int, grade int);

INSERT INTO grade
    (gradeID, studentID, assignmentID, grade)
VALUES
    (1, 3, 1, 100),
    (2, 3, 2, 100),
    (3, 3, 3, 100),
    (4, 2, 1, 100),
    (5, 2, 2, 100),
    (6, 1, 1, 100);
share|improve this answer
    
Can you edit your sql to match my needed output that I posted? –  OneSneakyMofo Apr 30 '12 at 3:56

Another approach, could be faster, the computation of total assignments is done only once:

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/23408/17

select s.studentID, s.studentName,


    count(g.assignmentID) as completed,
    ta.total - count(g.assignmentID) as incomplete,

    ta.total

from student s
cross join (select count(*) as total from assignment) as ta

left join grade g 
on g.studentId = s.studentId

group by s.studentId

This however requires foreign key consistency between grade's assignmentID and assignment's assignmentID, as this query blindly counts the assignment on student

share|improve this answer

Here is one way to achieve it. You can perform a full outer join between the tables student and assignment since you want all the combinations between them to be included in the resultset. On the derived output table that contains all the combination of students and assignments, add a LEFT OUTER JOIN with the table grade to fetch the grade results,

Click here to view the demo in SQL Fiddle.

Script:

CREATE TABLE assignment
(
    assignmentid    INT         NOT NULL
  , assignmenttype  VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
  , totalscore      INT         NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE grade
(
    gradeid         INT NOT NULL
  , studentid       INT NOT NULL
  , assignmentid    INT NOT NULL
  , grade           INT NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE student
(
    studentid   INT         NOT NULL
  , studentname VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO assignment (assignmentid, assignmenttype, totalscore) VALUES
    (1, 'Assignment', 100),
    (2, 'Assignment', 100),
    (3, 'Assignment', 100),
    (4, 'Test', 200);

INSERT INTO grade (gradeid, studentid, assignmentid, grade) VALUES
    (1, 3, 1, 100),
    (2, 3, 2, 100),
    (3, 3, 3, 100),
    (4, 2, 1, 100),
    (5, 2, 2, 100),
    (6, 1, 1, 100);

INSERT INTO student (studentid, studentname) VALUES
    (1, 'John'),
    (2, 'Jane'),
    (3, 'Joe'),
    (4, 'Jill');

SELECT  sa.studentid
    ,   sa.studentname
    ,   sa.assignmentid
    ,   g.grade
FROM
(
        SELECT  s.studentid
            ,   s.studentname
            ,   a.assignmentid 
        FROM    student     s
            ,   assignment  a
)               sa 
LEFT OUTER JOIN grade g
ON              sa.studentid    = g.studentid
AND             sa.assignmentid = g.assignmentid
ORDER BY        sa.studentid
            ,   sa.assignmentid;

Output:

STUDENTID STUDENTNAME ASSIGNMENTID GRADE
--------- ----------- ------------ -----
     1    John              1       100
     1    John              2       
     1    John              3 
     1    John              4 
     2    Jane              1       100
     2    Jane              2       100
     2    Jane              3 
     2    Jane              4 
     3    Joe               1       100
     3    Joe               2       100
     3    Joe               3       100
     3    Joe               4 
     4    Jill              1 
     4    Jill              2 
     4    Jill              3 
     4    Jill              4 
share|improve this answer
    
Can you edit your sql to match my needed output that I posted? –  OneSneakyMofo Apr 30 '12 at 3:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.