Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a mobile site but I need a script to redirect a user to it if they are on a mobile device.

share|improve this question
    
you don't. your site is your mobile site –  Raynos Apr 30 '12 at 0:48
    
You don't need JS to do this - check out my answer for an example of a PHP solution. It's different to what you were thinking, but quicker and cleaner, and also doesn't depend on JS etc. CSS solutions are valid, but hard to reverse implement on an existing site. –  dmp Apr 30 '12 at 0:48
    
@raynos, up to a point, but depends on the objectives of the site. –  dmp Apr 30 '12 at 0:49
1  
Seperate mobile sites are bad design. –  Raynos Apr 30 '12 at 0:51
2  
Aside: What's up with the uncommented downvote spray on these answers? –  apsillers Apr 30 '12 at 0:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are several ways you can do it, but detecting the screen size is a good way to do that. Note that the screen width is independent of the browser window size.

<script type="text/javascript">
<!--
if (screen.width <= 699) {
  document.location = "mobile.html";
}
//-->
</script>

You can also match specific devices like the iPhone or iPod by the User Agent string.

<script language=javascript>
<!--
if ((navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i)) || (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPod/i))) {
   location.replace("http://url-to-send-them/iphone.html");
}
-->
</script>

Important Caveat

While this works, it's also very annoying to get redirected to the mobile site's front page when you're trying to visit a particular page. For example, when you follow a link from Facebook trying to access an article, if the site redirects you to the front page of the mobile version of the site, it's infuriating and very unhelpful! Chances are, they'll never try hard enough to find the content.

paulsm4 is correct that using CSS to serve a mobile layout for your site at the same URL instead of redirecting is a much more desirable solution. However if that's not an option, the next best thing is to redirect to the matching URL for the mobile version of the site.

For example, if you just have a different subdomain for your mobile site, then you can use Javascript to redirect to the correct page of the mobile version:

<script type="text/javascript">
<!--
// Full URL:   http://example.com/articles/1
// Mobile URL: http://mobile.example.com/articles/1
if (screen.width <= 699) {
  // Redirect to the same page on the mobile site
  document.location.host = "mobile." + document.location.host;
}
//-->
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think screen width is a sensible solution. UA sniffing is not perfect, but if you absolutely have to do this kind of filtering, forcing a user to load a mobile site with a JS redirect because their window is an arbitrary size is not going to cut it. What happens if a user has reduced their window to load a site, then maximises it afterwards? Are you going to detect the resize event, and force a reload..? –  dmp Apr 30 '12 at 12:18
1  
I said this earlier, but I'll reiterate - "Note that the screen width is independent of the browser window size." You can test it by making your browser window small and calling screen.width in a javascript console. You'll still see your actual screen (resolution) width. –  nilbus Apr 30 '12 at 16:53

You have to detect the browser first. Here's a page containing info about browser detection using javascript: http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_browser.asp If the detected browser was one of the mobile browsers, then you redirect them to another page. Here's a very useful page about this subject: http://www.zytrax.com/tech/web/mobile_ids.html also contains php code for browser detection

share|improve this answer
    
-1 read w3fools –  Raynos Apr 30 '12 at 1:05

Your first line of defense should be to use CSS:

Short of that, here's some Javascript that can do a redirect for you:

share|improve this answer
1  
-1 this isn't what he's asking. –  dmp Apr 30 '12 at 0:50
    
@danp what part of document.location = uri is not a redirect ? –  Raynos Apr 30 '12 at 0:52
    
your user went to your site. they don't want to have to load a full desktop site then get bounced onto a mobile site (including all associated resource loading in the worst case scenario) when you can do http user agent filtering.. server side. –  dmp Apr 30 '12 at 1:00
    
it's inefficient. The main reason to redirect to mobile is a mobile UI. The secondary reason is loading speeds –  Raynos Apr 30 '12 at 1:03

You don't have to do this with JS - the browser actually sends the agent string to PHP before anything is sent back to the browser in the HTTP headers. Have a look at $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'] and you'll see what I mean.

CodeIgniter has a user agent class that can help with this kind of behaviour. The source for it is here and the resource file it uses with browser agent strings is here.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no reliable way to map between userAgent and "user wants a mobile friendly interface" –  Raynos Apr 30 '12 at 1:04
    
Maybe, but it's about the best way to do it. As long as the user has the option to always go back to a desktop site if they want, I'm ok with this, and this is how I would tackle the problem. –  dmp Apr 30 '12 at 1:12
    
Responsive / mobile first web design handles the entire problem more elegantly. –  Raynos Apr 30 '12 at 10:36
    
Server side filtering (if you really, really have to use UA sniffing) is the most unobtrusive way to do it, coupled with a link back to the full site for when UA sniffing gets it wrong. The user should be presented with an interface appropriate for their device. Media queries are great if you can factor in all the various problems and incompatibilities (of which there are many), but it's often impractical to do this on an existing codebase. –  dmp Apr 30 '12 at 12:18
    
that's a really good point. In cost effective terms it's far easier to build a mobile version from scratch then refactor an existing website to be responsive. –  Raynos Apr 30 '12 at 12:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.