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The problem is: I've say 5 methods that should be used in sequence by each thread

Method1(); then Method2(); then Method3(); then Method4(); then Method5();

I've also 5 threads running numbered from 1 to 5

I want to implement the following scenario:

I want thread one to start using method1 then move to method2 [In parallel I want thread 2 to start using method1 which is now not used]

then when thread one moves to method3, and thread two proceeds to method 2, thread 3 should start using the now free method one, and so on.

public void Execute(object OPCounter)
{
    //Method 1
    lock (thisLock)
    {
    FetchedInstructionQueue[PCounter] = Stager.Stage1(InstructionsMemory);
    }

    //Method 2
    lock (thisLock)
    {
    DecordedInstructionQueue[PCounter] = Stager.Stage2(FetchedInstructionQueue, regMem);
    }

    //Method 3
    lock (thisLock)
    {
    ALUResultQueue[PCounter] = Stager.Stage3(DecordedInstructionQueue);
    }

    lock (thisLock)
    {
    MemoryQueue[PCounter] = Stager.Stage4(DecordedInstructionQueue, memory, ALUResultQueue);
    }

    lock (thisLock)
    {
    object obj = Stager.Stage5(DecordedInstructionQueue, ALUResultQueue, regMem, memory, MemoryQueue);
    InternalWriter(PCounter, obj);
    }

}

///This is the initiator of threads

private void ExecuteBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    InstructionsMemory = InstructionsTextBox.Text.Split('\n');
    FetchedInstructionQueue = new string[InstructionsMemory.Length];
    DecordedInstructionQueue = new Instruction[InstructionsMemory.Length];
    ALUResultQueue = new int[InstructionsMemory.Length];
    MemoryQueue = new int[InstructionsMemory.Length];
    Thread[] threads = new Thread[InstructionsMemory.Length];

    for (APCounter = 0; APCounter < InstructionsMemory.Length; APCounter = 5 + APCounter)
    {
        if (APCounter + 5 < InstructionsMemory.Length)
        {
            object s1 = APCounter;
            object s2 = APCounter + 1;
            object s3 = APCounter + 2;
            object s4 = APCounter + 3;
            object s5 = APCounter + 4;

            threads[APCounter] = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Execute));
            threads[APCounter + 1] = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Execute));
            threads[APCounter + 2] = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Execute));
            threads[APCounter + 3] = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Execute));
            threads[APCounter + 4] = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Execute));

            threads[APCounter].Start(s1);
            threads[APCounter + 1].Start(s2);
            threads[APCounter + 2].Start(s3);
            threads[APCounter + 3].Start(s4);
            threads[APCounter + 4].Start(s5);
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Sounds like a producer/consumer scenario. Take a look at BlockingCollection<T>‌​. – Joe White Apr 30 '12 at 0:46
    
@JoeWhite - I'm not sure. I will have to read it again, probably several times. – Martin James Apr 30 '12 at 1:13
    
These 5 methods - are they methods of the same object instance? I ask because your question is a little unclear. Methods themselves are code and, as such are thread-safe and don't need any synchronization. It might be better if you could give some little example, or maybe some pseudocode? – Martin James Apr 30 '12 at 1:17
    
Sounds like a synchronisation homework question. – AndrewS Apr 30 '12 at 1:25
    
@Daniel : I've tried the above demonstration – user1364852 Apr 30 '12 at 1:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm writing this as an answer since the clarification required won't fit in a comment.

You seem to have a pipeline of work to be done (on a particular object, which may or may not mutate). You also have a number of threads to do this pipeline. The pipeline consists of 5 stages.

In general, with pipelines, you want one thread per step in the pipeline (that is, one thread for step 1, one thread for step 2, one thread for step 3 and so on). Let's call this Option A.

You seem to want to set it up so that the thread follows the object being worked on. So thread one covers object 1 through all 5 stages, then thread 2 covers object 2 and so on. It's not clear why you'd want to do this, but let's run with it anyway. Let's call this Option B.

I'll show options using 3 threads and 3 stages for simplicity.

Option A: Traditional Pipeline

3 stages, 1 thread per stage, object moves between stages.

void Main()
{
    var stage1Queue = new BlockingCollection<object>(new ConcurrentQueue<object>());
    var stage2Queue = new BlockingCollection<object>(new ConcurrentQueue<object>());
    var stage3Queue = new BlockingCollection<object>(new ConcurrentQueue<object>());

    var threads = new Thread[] {new Thread(() => Stage1Worker(stage1Queue, stage2Queue)),
                                new Thread(() => Stage2Worker(stage2Queue, stage3Queue)),
                                new Thread(() => Stage3Worker(stage3Queue))
                               };

    foreach (var thread in threads) thread.Start();

    stage1Queue.Add("*");
    stage1Queue.Add("*");
    stage1Queue.Add("*");

    Console.ReadKey();
}

public void Stage1Worker(BlockingCollection<object> queue, BlockingCollection<object> next)
{
    foreach (var task in queue.GetConsumingEnumerable())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(task); // do work here, even mutating task if needed
        next.TryAdd(task.ToString() + "*"); // will always succeed for a ConcurrentQueue
    }
}

public void Stage2Worker(BlockingCollection<object> queue, BlockingCollection<object> next)
{
    foreach (var task in queue.GetConsumingEnumerable())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(task); // do work here, even mutating task if needed
        next.TryAdd(task.ToString() + "*"); // will always succeed for a ConcurrentQueue
    }
}

public void Stage3Worker(BlockingCollection<object> queue)
{
    foreach (var task in queue.GetConsumingEnumerable())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(task); // do work here, even mutating task if needed
        // no more work!
    }
}

Option B: Synchronised Method Access Pipeline

This is quite a strange one, and without knowing the 'why' of this it's hard to find a suitable solution. The following ensures that a single task is executed by a single thread, and the threads wait for access to each method. However, it does not guarantee that thread 1 does task 1, thread 2 task 2 etc.. whichever thread is ready will pick up the 'next' task.

object stage1Lock = new object();
object stage2Lock = new object();
object stage3Lock = new object();

void Main()
{
    var tasks = new BlockingCollection<object>(new ConcurrentQueue<object>());

    var threads = new Thread[] {new Thread(() => Worker(1, tasks)),
                                new Thread(() => Worker(2, tasks)),
                                new Thread(() => Worker(3, tasks))
                               };

    foreach (var thread in threads) thread.Start();

    tasks.Add("*");
    tasks.Add("**");
    tasks.Add("***");
    tasks.Add("****");
    tasks.Add("*****");

    LINQPad.Util.ReadLine();
}

public void Worker(int id, BlockingCollection<object> tasks)
{
    foreach (var task in tasks.GetConsumingEnumerable())
    {   
        Console.WriteLine(id + " got task: " + task);

        lock (stage1Lock){
            Console.WriteLine(id + " - Stage 1: " + task);
        }

        lock (stage2Lock){
            Console.WriteLine(id + " - Stage 2: " + task);
        }

        lock (stage3Lock){
            Console.WriteLine(id + " - Stage 3: " + task);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm thinking about using priority to guarantee the sequence of the pipeline – user1364852 May 1 '12 at 2:53
    
Still struggling to see why you'd need a particular identified thread to execute a certain bit of code in order. Hard to imagine any use case that either of the above two options won't support. – yamen May 1 '12 at 2:55
    
It was done by modifying option B to utilize the Thread.Sleep() to get threads to sleep until a certain condition is met, and then they could proceed. : ) Ty @yamen – user1364852 May 1 '12 at 6:21

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