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I'm trying to understand the reccommended way for defining Spring Security in Spring-MVC applications, where the bean definitions is split across multiple parent/child contexts.

For example, my current app's web.xml looks as follows, (which I understand to be fairly standard)

<context-param>
    <param-name>contextConfigLocation</param-name>
    <param-value>
    classpath:applicationContext.xml
    /WEB-INF/securityContext.xml
    </param-value>
</context-param>
<listener>
    <listener-class>org.springframework.web.context.ContextLoaderListener</listener-class>
</listener>
<filter>
    <filter-name>springSecurityFilterChain</filter-name>
    <filter-class>org.springframework.web.filter.DelegatingFilterProxy</filter-class>
</filter>
<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>springSecurityFilterChain</filter-name>
    <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
</filter-mapping>
<servlet>
    <servlet-name>spring-mvc</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>org.springframework.web.servlet.DispatcherServlet</servlet-class>
    <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>spring-mvc</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/app/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

So, I have a standard ContextLoaderListener defined at /, which loads my global configs - applicationContext.xml and securityContext.xml. I also define the spring mvc DispatcherServlet at /app/, which loads it's own beans from spring-mvc-servlet.xml.

As I understand it, config defined in spring-mvc-servlet.xml is not visible to config defined in either of the top-level context files.

Where then is the best place to define app-level security concepts? For example, I'd like to add the following filter.

<security:http pattern="/oauth/token" create-session="stateless" entry-point-ref="oauthAuthenticationEntryPoint">
    <security:custom-filter ref="clientCredentialsTokenEndpointFilter" before="BASIC_AUTH_FILTER" />
</security:http>

This is so that requests to /app/oauth/token pass through this filter, and get basic authentication processed.

Because this pertains directly to a concern of the Spring-MVC app, I initially defined it in spring-mvc-context.xml (which is why the app is excluded from the url).

However, this means it's not visible to the security config defined in securityContext.xml, so it's ignored.

So, I move it up to securityContext.xml, but in doing so, also must move all the dependencies. I quickly end up moving everything up to applicationContext.xml, which leaves the spring-mvc-context.xml almost empty.

Is this common? What is the reccomended split between what is defined in top-level contexts, and what gets defined in child contexts?

Given that spring-mvc defines a series of controllers, which I want to mark as @Secured, how will these be processed if the controller is not visible to the security context?

Do I need to move my <mvc:annotation-driven /> from the servlet.xml to the global applicationContext.xml? Do I need additional configuration within the spring-mvc-servlet.xml to tell it to participate in Spring security?

I've read the documentation on Spring-MVC, but there's very few specifics on how to configure this. Additionally, the Spring OAuth examples seem to define everything within a single config file, which doesn't seem very real-world, and seems to contradict other examples I've read.

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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First: the beans defined within applicationContext.xml (ContextLoaderListener) can not access the one defined in spring-mvc-servlet.xml (DispatcherServlet) but not the other way around.

You asked:


Given that spring-mvc defines a series of controllers, which I want to mark as @Secured, how will these be processed if the controller is not visible to the security context?

So this works without problems, because the controllers must be defined in the spring-mvc-servlet.xml, so they "see" the Spring Security stuff defined in applicationContext.xml


Do I need to move my from the servlet.xml to the global applicationContext.xml?

No


Do I need additional configuration within the spring-mvc-servlet.xml to tell it to participate in Spring security?

No


... which leaves the spring-mvc-context.xml almost empty. Is this common?

The spring-mvc-context.xml should contain every thing that is related to Web Stuff (except secrutiy). So the common parts of the spring-mvc-context.xml are component scan for @Controller, some Interceptors (mvc:interceptors), mvc:resources, mvc:default-servlet-handler, mvc:view-controller, ReloadableResourceBundleMessageSource, CookieLocaleResolver, .SimpleMappingExceptionResolver...

BTW: If you use component scan, then you need two of them, one at applicationContext.xml to scan for @Service @Repository and @Component (But not @Controller) and a second in spring-mvc-context.xml that only scan for @Controller!


@See also this question: ContextLoaderListener or not? It discuss the theme from an other point of view.

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