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I have created a customer c# DropDownList control that can render out it's contents are optgroups (Not from scratch, I edited some code found on the internet, although I do understand exactly what it's doing), and it works fine.

However, I have now come across a situation where I need to have two levels of indentation in my dropdown, i.e.

<select>
    <optgroup label="Level One">
     <option> A.1 </option>
     <optgroup label="Level Two">
      <option> A.B.1 </option>
     </optgroup>
     <option> A.2 </option>
    </optgroup>
</select>

However, as far as I'm aware this will just render like normal optgroups.

Is there a way to produce this nested behaviour?

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5 Answers 5

The HTML spec here is really broken. It should allow nested optgroups and recommend user agents render them as nested menus. Instead, only one optgroup level is allowed. However, they do have to say the following on the subject:

Note. Implementors are advised that future versions of HTML may extend the grouping mechanism to allow for nested groups (i.e., OPTGROUP elements may nest). This will allow authors to represent a richer hierarchy of choices.

And user agents could start using submenus to render optgoups instead of displaying titles before the first option element in an optgroup as they do now.

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That's true, you cannot create a multiple level nested tree with option groups, neither with html 5, also the note is false. –  inf3rno Mar 19 '12 at 20:46
    
Anyone know if they plan to visit this in HTML5? Seems like a massive oversight. –  Sweepster Jan 9 '13 at 1:11
2  
According to the HTML5 spec (dev.w3.org/html5/markup/optgroup.html#optgroup) the only permitted parent of optgroup is select, which suggest that no, this is not supported in HTML5. –  Dan Atkinson Feb 22 at 18:11
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This is just fine but if you add option witch is not in optgroup it gets buggy.

<select>
       <optgroup label="Level One">
         <option> A.1 </option>
         <optgroup label="nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Level Two">
          <option>nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; A.B.1 </option>
         </optgroup>
         <option> A.2 </option>
        </optgroup>

        <option> A </option>

</select>

Would be much better if you used css and close optgroup right away :

<select>
    <optgroup label="Level One"></optgroup>
     <option style="padding-left:15px"> A.1 </option>
     <optgroup label="Level Two" style="padding-left:15px"></optgroup>
      <option style="padding-left:30px"> A.B.1 </option>    
     <option style="padding-left:15px"> A.2 </option>
    <option> A </option>
</select>
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1  
Perfect, much easier since you can do style="padding-left:'. (15 * $level). 'px" in a loop over a tree of items. –  Xeoncross Nov 19 '10 at 16:46
3  
unfortunately this does not work in safari, since padding in <option> is not rendered –  markus Apr 19 '11 at 15:31
2  
CSS to the rescue: you can remove the padding-left and use text-indent instead, adding the same amount to your select box width (source: stackoverflow.com/questions/2966855/…) –  Potherca Jun 11 '11 at 23:45
1  
optgroup, never heard of that...+1 –  Travis J May 4 '12 at 18:58
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up vote 12 down vote accepted

Ok, if anyone ever reads this: the best option is to add four &nbsp;s at each extra level of indentation, it would seem!

so:

<select>
 <optgroup label="Level One">
  <option> A.1 </option>
  <optgroup label="&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Level Two">
   <option>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A.B.1 </option>
  </optgroup>
  <option> A.2 </option>
 </optgroup>
</select>
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1  
Thankyou so much! An obvious solution but I would never have thought of it. –  Nico Burns Sep 11 '10 at 21:38
71  
By doing that you literraly kill your select's usability, by not allowing users to press the first letter of an item to quick-scroll to that letter. –  Geoffrey Bachelet May 26 '11 at 12:29
14  
Paradoxically, Geoffrey, it simultaneously improves usability by providing a visual hierarchy. Funny old world. –  Jake Rayson Jul 26 '12 at 16:24
1  
Another reason this is not ideal is a selected option with a lot of indent looks unusual when the select is not active because of all the padding –  Ryan Oct 22 '13 at 17:34
3  
Inspect the DOM... the optgroups are not actually nested. At least in Firefox. It closes the first optgroup when it sees the 2nd. –  Mark Nov 21 '13 at 23:45
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I know this was quite a while ago, however I have a little extra to add:

This is not possible in HTML5 or any previous specs, nor is it proposed in HTML5.1 yet. I have made a request to the public-html-comments mailing list, but we'll see if anything comes of it.

Regardless, whilst this is not possible using <select> yet, you can achieve a similar effect with the following HTML, plus some CSS for prettiness:

<ul>
    <li>
        <input type="radio" name="location" value="0" id="loc_0" />
        <label for="loc_0">United States</label>

        <ul>
            <li>
                Northeast

                <ul>
                    <li>
                        <input type="radio" name="location" value="1" id="loc_1" />
                        <label for="loc_1">New Hampshire</label>
                    </li>

                    <li>
                        <input type="radio" name="location" value="2" id="loc_2" />
                        <label for="loc_2">Vermont</label>
                    </li>

                    <li>
                        <input type="radio" name="location" value="3" id="loc_3" />
                        <label for="loc_3">Maine</label>
                    </li>
                </ul>
            </li>

            <li>
                Southeast

                <ul>
                    <li>
                        <input type="radio" name="location" value="4" id="loc_4" />
                        <label for="loc_4">Georgia</label>
                    </li>

                    <li>
                        <input type="radio" name="location" value="5" id="loc_5" />
                        <label for="loc_5">Alabama</label>
                    </li>
                </ul>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </li>

    <li>
        <input type="radio" name="location" value="6" id="loc_6" />
        <label for="loc_6">Canada</label>

        <ul>
            <li>
                <input type="radio" name="location" value="7" id="loc_7" />
                <label for="loc_7">Ontario</label>
            </li>

            <li>
                <input type="radio" name="location" value="8" id="loc_8" />
                <label for="loc_8">Quebec</label>
            </li>

            <li>
                <input type="radio" name="location" value="9" id="loc_9" />
                <label for="loc_9">Manitoba</label>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

As an extra added benefit, this also means you can allow selection of the <optgroups> themselves. This might be useful if you had, for example, nested categories where the categories go into heavy detail and you want to allow users to select higher up in the hierarchy.

This will all work without JavaScript, however you might wish to add some to hide the radio buttons and then change the background color of the selected item or something.

Bear in mind, this is far from a perfect solution, but if you absolutely need a nested select with reasonable cross-browser compatibility, this is probably as close as you're going to get.

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Can you add some sample CSS prettiness for those of us who do not know CSS as well as maybe we should? –  Pat May 16 at 21:00
    
I would consider this as a brilliant solution. –  njs Jul 7 at 17:50
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I think if you have something that structured and complex, you might consider something other than a single drop-down box.

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4  
Not my design, I just implement things, although I agree that it's reasonably insane. Part of the joy of being brought in to work on a pre-agreed design. –  Ed Woodcock Jun 24 '09 at 12:22
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